The Teradata Database and the Intelligent Expansion of the Data Warehouse

In 2002 Teradata launched the Teradata Active Enterprise Data Warehouse, becoming a key player in the data warehouse and business intelligence scene, a role that Teradata has maintained until now. Teradata mixes rigorous business and technical discipline with well-thought-out innovation in order to enable organizations to expand their analytical platforms and evolve their data initiatives. In this report TEC Senior BI analyst Jorge Garcia looks at the Teradata Data Warehouse in detail, including functionality, distinguishing characteristics, and Teradata's role in the competitive data warehouse space.

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As data grows “bigger,” gets increasingly complex, and runs faster, it still needs to be analyzed efficiently. Some companies have taken radical approaches to addressing the challenge of evolving their data analysis platforms specifically to match their existing data warehouse and new big data initiatives. With 30 years’ experience in the data warehousing space, Teradata takes an interesting approach, mixing rigorous business and technical discipline with well-thought-out innovation in order to enable organizations to expand their analytical platforms and evolve their data initiatives with products for supporting and combining the sometimes distant worlds of data warehousing and big data.
 

About Teradata

Teradata, a public company (Nasdaq: TCD) based in Dayton, Ohio, is the result of the work and vision developed in the late 60s and early 70s within the offices of Scientific Data Systems (SDS)—later part of Xerox Corporation—and the California Institute of Technology (CalTech).
 
In the late 1970s, with an initial investment of $25 and good use of their personal credit cards, Dr. Jack Shemer, Dr. Phil Neches, and other investors and founders, including David Hartke and Jerry Modes, formed Teradata in July 1979—now one of the most important database, data warehouse, and analytics providers in the marketplace.
 
Innovation on their side, just one year after the company’s founding, Teradata’s creators were able to raise $2.6 million (USD) in venture capital funding, and by 1981 were again able to raise $12 million (USD) in a second round of financing. 

Teradata’s road to the data warehouse space officially started in 1983 with the launch of its  first beta data warehouse appliance, the DBC/1012 Model 1, the foundation for Teradata’s  later dominance in the data warehousing arena. Some of the system’s innovations included  being specifically devoted to back-end database management for mainframes, and the  introduction of YNET, Teradata’s system for enabling parallel node interconnection (which  has evolved into BYNET, Teradata’s software-based high-speed and massive parallel  interconnect system).

Twenty years later, in 2002—after being acquired by NCR (formerly National Cash Register) in the 1980s and later by AT&T in 1991—and achieving success as one of the largest providers of database technologies in the world—Teradata launched the Teradata Active Enterprise Data Warehouse, becoming a key player in the data warehouse and business intelligence scene, a role that Teradata has maintained until now.

Along with its vast history and experience, Teradata has gained customers that span a vast number of industries and types of organizations. Well-known organizations such as Air Canada, Coca Cola, Ford Motor Company, and Electronic Arts are just a few of a large number of customers that currently use one or more of Teradata’s data management solutions.


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