Deacom Certification at a Glance: A Prelude to the Certification Report




We recently certified Deacom Integrated Accounting and ERP Software v 10.4. Before sharing my impressions of Deacom’s product, I would like to briefly describe the certification process so you can better understand how it works.

The Process: It all starts with a request for information (RFI) file, which is a hierarchical list of system features and functions that the vendor completes by rating each criterion as Supported, Not Supported, Future Release, etc. Since Deacom was certified in our ERP engineer-to-order (ETO), ERP mixed-mode, and ERP for process manufacturing knowledge bases, they had to complete a combined RFI that contained about 5000 features and functions.

During the certification, we used a demo script that contained a representative sampling of criteria from the RFI. It  normally takes the analysts around three hours to complete a certification—usually in one session—but sometimes we have to split the session over two days. For more details on the certification process, please read the following blog post: TEC Certification Explained


I would like to mention that I particularly liked the honesty and full cooperation that Paul Heinmiller and Susan Shaw exercised during the certification process. I mention this because vendors often try to sell us the product, rather than demo it for the certification. For example, if a vendor initially rates a criterion as supported and during the certification it is determined that it is not supported, some vendors will argue over it and waste precious time on something that in the end will have no direct impact on the overall rating of the product.

About the product: I will just briefly cover some of the high-level details, and leave the finer details for the TEC Product Certification Report, which will be available to our readers here . Deacom ERP is what I call a “classic” ERP, which means that the interface is not something that a “generation Z” user would like very much. It’s not Web-based and not extremely intuitive, but simple and practical. Frankly, even though it helps, I don’t think that an interface for an ERP system needs to be too fancy anyway.

What really matters for an ERP is the functionality behind the interface—which should be robust and complex, but also flexible and logical like Deacom ERP. Legacy data can be imported and integration with other systems is possible (e.g., ADP and other payroll software). Securities and user access can be managed at the window, menu, tab, and even field level. Furthermore, exceptions to the default securities of each user group can be defined, which makes administration tasks easier.

From a business management perspective, Deacom is one of the best products we have in our database for process manufacturing. Detailed product analysis, as well as a section describing Deacom’s competitive advantages—among others—will be available in the certification report that we are currently working on. Follow this blog or my Twitter account  (ggheorghiu) to be the first to read TEC’s Deacom Product Certification Report.
 
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