Containerized Power and Cooling Modules for Data Centers

Standardized, pre-assembled, and integrated data center facility power and cooling modules are at least 60% faster to deploy, and provide a first cost savings of 13% or more compared with traditional data center power and cooling infrastructure. Facility modules, also referred to in the data center industry as containerized power and cooling plants, allow data center designers to shift their thinking from a customized “construction” mentality to a standardized “site integration” mentality. This white paper compares the cost of both scenarios, presents the advantages and disadvantages of each, and identifies which environments can best leverage the facility module approach.

Featured Software Research:

ERP Can Be a Barrier to Agility in Electric Power Sector

  • Source: IFS
  • Written By:
  • Published:
In this white paper, we’ll examine the different enterprise agility barriers reported by study respondents and discuss how energy industry executives can select software for enhanced enterprise agility and change readiness. Read More

Software Usability Challenge for Electric Power Industry

  • Source: IFS
  • Written By:
  • Published:
Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP)/Enterprise Asset Management (EAM) usability is a challenge for the electric energy industry according to a study conducted for IFS North America. This paper outlines study results of 100 electric energy industry executives and offers advice for selecting ERP and EAM for maximum usability. ERP and EAM with enhanced usability increases productivity and system usage, maximizing value realized. Read More

You may also be interested in these related documents:

Energy-efficient Cooling for Data Centers: A Close-coupled Row Solution

Perimeter computer-room air handlers and central air-handling units have been used to cool data centers since the launch of the mainframe. But as rack power grew, air delivery and heat removal challenges appeared. Row-based designs address issues of proper heat removal and cold air supply—and bring energy-efficiency advantages. Learn more about row-based solutions and the benefits they can deliver to your data center. Read More

Cooling Strategies for Ultra-high Density Racks and Blade Servers

The average power consumed by an enclosure in a data center is about 1.7 kilowatts (kWs), but the maximum power that can be obtained by filling a rack with available high density servers, such as blade servers, is over 20 kW. Find out about the power density values of current and new data centers, and learn practical approaches to creating strategies for deploying high-density computing, with limitations and benefits. Read More

Guidelines for Specification of Data Center Power Density

Conventional methods for specifying data center density don’t provide the guidance to assure predictable power and cooling performance for the latest IT equipment. Discover an improved method that can help assure compatibility with anticipated high-density loads, provide unambiguous instruction for design and installation of power and cooling equipment, prevent oversizing, and maximize electrical efficiency. Read More
 
comments powered by Disqus