Deploying High-density Zones in a Low-density Data Center

New power and cooling technology allows for a simple and rapid deployment of self-contained high-density zones within an existing or new low-density data center. The independence of these high-density zones allows for reliable high-density equipment operation without a negative impact on existing power and cooling infrastructure—and with more electrical efficiency than conventional designs. Learn more now.

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The VMTurbo Cloud Control Plane: Software-driven Control for the Software-defined Data Center

The software-defined data center has the potential to extend the agility, operational, and capital benefits of virtualization throughout the data center stack. This paper outlines the need for software-driven control—the intelligence or “control plane” that can take advantage of the new software-defined capabilities, enabling enterprises and service providers to achieve the true potential of software-defined flexibility.  Read More

Transform Your Business with Data and Analytics

  • Source: IBM
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Harnessing all data and analytics to extract valuable insight sharpens your organization’s competitive edge. This paper presents a five-step approach to identifying, assessing, and deploying big data and analytics that repositions it as a central engine for your business. In the age of big data, this proactive strategy, combined with proper support, guidance and follow-through, can set your business apart in an increasingly crowded marketplace. Read More

The Application Deluge and Visibility Imperative

The information technology (IT) environment of today’s organizations is becoming complex and hence difficult to monitor and manage. For one thing, business applications can reside in corporate data centers or in the cloud—while users can be work near these centers or far across the globe. IT teams are therefore increasingly burdened with providing the required visibility into and control over the entire network—and with ensuring the high performance and availability of mission-critical applications.... Read More

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Cooling Strategies for Ultra-high Density Racks and Blade Servers

The average power consumed by an enclosure in a data center is about 1.7 kilowatts (kWs), but the maximum power that can be obtained by filling a rack with available high density servers, such as blade servers, is over 20 kW. Find out about the power density values of current and new data centers, and learn practical approaches to creating strategies for deploying high-density computing, with limitations and benefits. Read More

Guidelines for Specification of Data Center Power Density

Conventional methods for specifying data center density don’t provide the guidance to assure predictable power and cooling performance for the latest IT equipment. Discover an improved method that can help assure compatibility with anticipated high-density loads, provide unambiguous instruction for design and installation of power and cooling equipment, prevent oversizing, and maximize electrical efficiency. Read More

Ten Cooling Solutions to Support High-density Server Deployment

High-density servers offer a significant performance per-watt benefit. However, they can present a significant cooling challenge. Most data centers are designed to cool an average of no more than 2 kilowatts per rack, but many new servers demand over 40. Thus, innovative strategies must be used to properly cool high-density equipment. Read about 10 approaches that can help increase cooling efficiency in your data center. Read More
 
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