E-discovery: Boiling the Ocean to Catch a Few Fish

Electronic discovery, or e-discovery, is the process of identifying, collecting, filtering, searching, de-duplicating, reviewing, and potentially producing electronically stored information that relates to pending or anticipated litigation. Some particular characteristics of e-discovery need to be considered when developing search solutions. Find out what they are, as well as the truth about the effectiveness of keywords.

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10 Critical Questions Manufacturers Should Ask Before Choosing a Cloud-based ERP Solution

Over the last few years, software as a service (SaaS), or cloud computing, has become a credible delivery model for business applications, eliminating many of the barriers that keep companies from implementing or upgrading their software. And it enables you to focus on your core business operations instead of managing IT. This white paper contains 10 questions to ask when considering a cloud-based ERP solution. Read More

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Understanding ESI Technology and Workflows

The advent of powerful yet inexpensive computers and global connectivity has produced data everywhere. Relevant data needs to be identified and brought into court. E-discovery essentially requires a professional approach to managing a project, with application of general principles to the legal world. Read this paper for a review of Electronically Stored Information (ESI) technology used for litigation and e-discovery. Read More

E-discovery: Collecting Evidence or Collecting Sanctions

What constitutes a right or a wrong e-discovery collection process can be subjective, with the last word belonging to a judge. From the attorney’s standpoint, there are only two main varieties of e-discovery collection procedures: copy/sequester and in-place hold (also referred to as hold in-place). This paper discusses the benefits and risks associated with both approaches and explains why copy/sequester is best-practice. Read More

E-discovery Compliance and The New Requirements of IT: The IT Manager’s Guide to 100% Compliance

Considering that e-mail and other electronically stored information (ESI) create the electronic equivalent of DNA evidence, there is no doubt that their evidentiary role will continue to expand. Learn how implementing a strategic e-discovery compliance program can help US and Canadian employers preserve, protect, and produce legally compliant e-mail and other ESI when compelled to do so by a court or regulatory body. Read More
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