Enterprise Payback: Qualitative and Quantitative Factors in the ROI Equation

The requirement that enterprise software vendors deliver a measurable return on investment (ROI) has never been greater than right now. Customers are demanding that ROI analysis be a critical factor in their decisions to acquire new enterprise software. Without a demonstrable return, few customers are willing to invest scarce capital and human resources in new enterprirse software. A more complete analysis of return can be had by looking at the overall payback that enterprise software can offer to a company. Enterprise software payback includes not only quantifiable improvements in bottom and top line functionality, but also more qualitative measures-—such as new business opportunities, improved customer and partner relations, and improved time to market—-that contribute significantly to the success of a company's enterprise software implementation and use.

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How Offshore Drilling Companies Realize ROI on an EAM Software Investment

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Rig owners and operators today have an increased focus on asset integrity management (AIM) and risk management, and are reassessing their investments in enterprise asset management (EAM) software to ensure they have applications in place that are properly implemented and functional, ensure compliance with regulations, and adopt AIM best practices. This white paper discusses the EAM software features that can play a role in software project ROI for drilling contractors as well as specific, discrete... Read More

Usability as an ERP Selection Criteria

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Enterprise resource planning (ERP) software is often criticized for being complex and difficult to use—which puts up a barrier to receiving potential benefits. Systems with integrated search functionality and Web-like interfaces can make ERP solutions easier to use. Learn how to evaluate ERP software for its usability, so you can avoid investing in platforms that aren’t evolved toward usable and efficient interfaces. Read More

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The Modern Approach to Workforce Planning: Best Practices in Today’s Economy

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