Home
 > Research and Reports > White Papers > Enterprise Planning: Linking Strategies, Plans, and R...

Enterprise Planning: Linking Strategies, Plans, and Resources for Competitive Advantage

Source: Oracle
Planning is a crucial management discipline that enables organizations to optimally allocate their finite resources, and achieve maximum potential. The more intelligently these resources are allocated in response to changing conditions and objectives, the better the business will perform. Indeed, improved business performance is why so many companies are aggressively evolving their planning processes and embracing planning best practices.


Featured publications:

DPAS Ratings and Selecting ERP for Aerospace and Defense
Source: IFS Defense Priorities and Allocations System (DPAS) ratings are driven by regulation, but can be turned into a competitive advantage in the market for an aerospace and defense contractor or manufacturer running the right software. Selecting the right enterprise resource planning (ERP), enterprise asset management (EAM)), and other enterprise software is a challenge, and this white paper contains tips for a successful selection. Read More...
Today's Challenges in Specialty Retail: How to Gain Competitive Advantage by Using Business Insight
Source: TECTURA Corporation Specialty retailers have to compete with multinational chains with deep pockets, vast scales of economy, and the most advanced technological tools. Smaller businesses must arm themselves to plan effectively plan and respond quickly to problems and changes. This paper shows how retailers can improve their business processes with integrated systems using analytics that can provide actionable reports and insight. Read More...
Discrete Manufacturing (ERP)
Source: Technology Evaluation Centers The simplified definition of enterprise resource planning (ERP) software is a set of applications that automate finance and human resources departments and help manufacturers handle jobs such as order processing and production scheduling. ERP began as a term used to describe a sophisticated and integrated software system used for manufacturing. In its simplest sense, ERP systems create interactive environments designed to help companies manage and analyze the business processes associated with manufacturing goods, such as inventory control, order taking, accounting, and much more. Although this basic definition still holds true for ERP systems, today its definition is expanding. Today’s leading ERP systems group all traditional company management functions (finance, sales, manufacturing, and human resources). Many systems include, with varying degrees of acceptance and skill, solutions that were formerly considered peripheral such as product data management (PDM), warehouse management, manufacturing execution system (MES), and reporting. During the last few years the functional perimeter of ERP systems began an expansion into its adjacent markets, such as supply chain management (SCM), customer relationship management (CRM), business intelligence/data warehousing, and e-business, the focus of this knowledge base is mainly on the traditional ERP realms of finance, materials planning, and human resources. The foundation of any ERP implementation must be a proper exercise of aligning customers'' IT technology with their business strategies, and subsequent software selection. Read More...


You may also be interested in these related documents:

Enabling Growth for Midsize Companies: Three Strategies for Growing Your Business
Source: SAP Growth—whether organic or acquisitive—is challenging executives today from a strategic as well as an operational perspective. Studies estimate that 50 to 80 percent of deals fail to reach their projected results. Discover the challenges inherent in three common growth models, and find out how to implement a solid, flexible, and adaptive foundation that can support your company’s corporate growth strategies. Read More...
Optimizing Financial Performance for a Competitive Edge
Source: SAP In addition to traditional duties like financial planning, reporting, and governance, chief financial officers (CFOs) and financial managers are being tasked with more strategic responsibilities. Learn how the right data, performance management applications, and resources can help finance managers improve operational efficiency, ensure regulatory compliance, and control performance for maximized profitability. Read More...
6 Steps for Linking Corporate Strategy to the Budget
Source: Infor Ask any three people in an organization why they budget and you’ll get three different answers. But no one says they budget in order to direct the way in which their organization will achieve its strategic goals—the intended purpose of the budget. For budgeting to become the relevant process it was meant to be, this gap must be fixed. Read More...

 
comments powered by Disqus



Recent Searches
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Others

©2014 Technology Evaluation Centers Inc. All rights reserved.