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Extending CRM Concepts in ERP Systems

Source: Technology Group International If you're a manufacturer or distributor considering an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system with an integrated customer relationship management (CRM) application, you need to find out how far the "CRM concept" really extends to other elements of the ERP system, such as order frequency, buyer habits, specific customer invoicing requirements, etc. How vendors answer the eight crucial questions in this report will tell you what you need to know.

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Enterprise 21
Source: Technology Group International TGI's Enterprise 21 ERP software offers a fully integrated software solution for wholesale distributors. Enterprise 21 ERP includes available-to-promise and capable-to-promise alerts and processes during order entry, which can help improve order line item fill rates, and reduce on-hand inventory carrying costs. In addition, Enterprise 21 includes fully integrated warehouse management (WM) functionality that completely enables radio-frequency (RF) and bar-code processes. Wholesale distributors can also leverage Enterprise 21 for procurement, inventory control, transportation management, financial management, pricing and promotions management (PPM), quality control, attributed inventory, quoting and conversion to orders, kitting and assembly, light manufacturing, landed costing, and customer relationship management (CRM). Read More...
Discrete Manufacturing (ERP)
Source: Technology Evaluation Centers The simplified definition of enterprise resource planning (ERP) software is a set of applications that automate finance and human resources departments and help manufacturers handle jobs such as order processing and production scheduling. ERP began as a term used to describe a sophisticated and integrated software system used for manufacturing. In its simplest sense, ERP systems create interactive environments designed to help companies manage and analyze the business processes associated with manufacturing goods, such as inventory control, order taking, accounting, and much more. Although this basic definition still holds true for ERP systems, today its definition is expanding. Today’s leading ERP systems group all traditional company management functions (finance, sales, manufacturing, and human resources). Many systems include, with varying degrees of acceptance and skill, solutions that were formerly considered peripheral such as product data management (PDM), warehouse management, manufacturing execution system (MES), and reporting. During the last few years the functional perimeter of ERP systems began an expansion into its adjacent markets, such as supply chain management (SCM), customer relationship management (CRM), business intelligence/data warehousing, and e-business, the focus of this knowledge base is mainly on the traditional ERP realms of finance, materials planning, and human resources. The foundation of any ERP implementation must be a proper exercise of aligning customers'' IT technology with their business strategies, and subsequent software selection. Read More...
Engineer-to-Order (ETO ERP)
Source: Technology Evaluation Centers The simplified definition of enterprise resource planning (ERP) software is a set of applications that automate finance and human resources departments and help manufacturers handle jobs such as order processing and production scheduling. ERP began as a term used to describe a sophisticated and integrated software system used for manufacturing. In its simplest sense, ERP systems create interactive environments designed to help companies manage and analyze the business processes associated with manufacturing goods, such as inventory control, order taking, accounting, and much more. Although this basic definition still holds true for ERP systems, today its definition is expanding. Today’s leading ERP systems group all traditional company management functions (finance, sales, manufacturing, and human resources). Many systems include, with varying degrees of acceptance and skill, solutions that were formerly considered peripheral such as product data management (PDM), warehouse management, manufacturing execution system (MES), and reporting. During the last few years the functional perimeter of ERP systems began an expansion into its adjacent markets, such as supply chain management (SCM), customer relationship management (CRM), business intelligence/data warehousing, and e-business, the focus of this knowledge base is mainly on the traditional ERP realms of finance, materials planning, and human resources. The foundation of any ERP implementation must be a proper exercise of aligning customers' IT technology with their business strategies, and subsequent software selection. Read More...


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