Goal-oriented Autonomic Business Process Management

Business process management (BPM) is an approach to administering business processes that involves people, organizations, and technologies—and can be carried out using varying levels of automation. Sadly, BPM often falls short of what it is intended to achieve. But there’s a fresh evolution of current BPM: goal-oriented autonomic BPM. Learn about the ideas, techniques, and benefits of autonomic and goal-oriented BPM.

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How is a BPM Project Achieved?

How can business process management (BPM) optimize business outcomes and performance?

BPM efforts have not been adopted as much as expected in the past decade, and process agility for operational excellence is still a distant goal for many enterprises. Extensibility issues and a lack of road maps are issues, as well as a series of economic events and general market instability that have redirected the spotlight to process optimization as the key to a sustainable profit model.

This white paper looks at some best practice approaches and pitfalls to avoid for optimal business results, and provides a framework for choosing “the right BPM project” for organizations. Nine critical challenges in adopting a core BPM approach are discussed, and several steps leading up to a successful BPM rollout for optimized business outputs are also given. The main risks associated with a BPM project implementation are then looked at.

Read this white paper for a concise and clear examination of the place of business process management in today’s competitive business performance landscape, and tips to help with successful implementation and management of BPM projects within organizations from the discovery stage right through to deployment.  Read More

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Goal-oriented Business Process Management

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