Guidelines for Specification of Data Center Power Density

Conventional methods for specifying data center density don’t provide the guidance to assure predictable power and cooling performance for the latest IT equipment. Discover an improved method that can help assure compatibility with anticipated high-density loads, provide unambiguous instruction for design and installation of power and cooling equipment, prevent oversizing, and maximize electrical efficiency.

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