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How Business Intelligence Happens

Source: IBM
Traditionally, business intelligence (BI) isn’t something you just install onto a server or client computer—which may be why some midsize companies have avoided it. Learn the basic processes by which BI is introduced into an environment, find out why it’s traditionally a time‐consuming and expensive proposition for most companies, and discover some of the ways in which you can implement BI more easily and for less money.


Featured publications:

When it comes to demand intelligence, which comes first? The right solution or the right architecture?
Source: LumiData Hands down, it’s the right business intelligence (BI) architecture. If your enterprise currently uses retail demand data in a manner that favors either tier one (corporate users) or tier two members (retail sales team), then you don’t have the right architecture in place. And that means you don’t have the right demand intelligence (DI) solution. Read on to learn about what's important in a demand intelligence architecture strategy and how to choose the right DI architecture for your company. Read More...
Best Practices: Five Ways Learning Managers Can Make a Strategic Contribution
Source: SuccessFactors In today’s business world, skill shortages are seen as a huge threat to business expansion. So your organization needs to be fill those gaps—and fast. But what happens when finding that talent just isn’t possible. This white paper discusses five ways you can make learning an integral solution to filling those skill gaps within your company. Read More...
The New Business of Business Leaders: Hiring and Onboarding
Source: Oracle This paper explores the role of business leaders in driving talent management functions, specifically around hiring and onboarding challenges. It discusses how talent intelligence helps business leaders find better candidates faster, make better build/buy/rent decisions, decrease new hire time-to-proficiency, and decrease the number of new hires who quickly leave. Read More...


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Business Intelligence: 5 Things to Watch for in 2010
Source: Focus Research Business intelligence (BI) efforts can only result in a truly intelligent, agile business if they are driven by business goals—comprehensively deployed and adopted; and managed in ways that produce meaningful, measurable and credible results. Discover five BI trends to watch out for in 2010, and learn how to develop an approach to BI that’s effective, and tailored to your organization’s unique needs and goals. Read More...
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