How Business Intelligence Happens

Traditionally, business intelligence (BI) isn’t something you just install onto a server or client computer—which may be why some midsize companies have avoided it. Learn the basic processes by which BI is introduced into an environment, find out why it’s traditionally a time‐consuming and expensive proposition for most companies, and discover some of the ways in which you can implement BI more easily and for less money.
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