Identity-based NAC and PCI Data Security Compliance

As of June 2006, the payment card industry (PCI) has established a detailed set of policy, procedure, infrastructure, and data security requirements for merchants that store and process credit card data. That’s why it’s vital for key PCI requirements to be met when it comes to encryption, user authentication, virus and malware control, access control, and auditing.

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The Complete Guide to Google Apps Security: Building a Comprehensive Google Apps Security Plan

Innovative cloud technologies require new ways of approaching security when it comes to data; traditional systems may be outdated and no longer suffice. Google Apps for Work does provide security within their system, but every company should check for potential protection gaps that may remain. When used in conjunction with other apps, Google Apps for Work gives your business the best protection and fully secures your company’s data. Ensuring your business has the top security measures in place allows people to work with confidence within the cloud, whether workers are onsite or mobile.

This Google Apps for Work protection guide outlines a detailed five-point plan for even greater data security by way of
  • securing core data
  • enhancing email protection
  • extending data recovery
  • locking down document security
  • saving Gmail and Docs for compliance
In this white paper you’ll learn how to customize and configure a variety of Google Apps for Work settings to your company’s specific needs, in a clear step-by-step process. In addition to self-customization, read how your team can further secure core data by using additional solution applications concurrently with Google Apps for Work such as CipherCloud to protect e-mail, Backupify to retain and restore data, Cloudlock for document protection, and Vault to help with compliance issues.  Read More

The Guide to Google Apps Training Part Four: Advanced Security Configuration and Compliance

Google offers protection of your information with its sophisticated data and encryption centers. But now that you’ve become comfortable with the tools and basic security settings for Google Apps, you can get more in-depth and establish other security settings on your own. This next level of control allows you to review the settings for the core of Google Apps and gives you even better protection over your data with the ability to configure security parameters for associated apps.

In this Google Apps Guide, get detailed information about commonly asked questions regarding Google security topics. Learn how to set levels of calendar sharing internally and externally, how to configure and restrict collaboration capabilities of Google Docs on- and off-line, and how to execute configurations of Gmail access for mobile device management and compliance for even more protection. A step-by-step process is provided for the creation and facilitation of groups, as well as granting or revoking a user’s individual permissions for security access to third-party apps. Review, enable (or disable), and configure a series of core Google Services, including: Chrome management, Google+, Google Vault, and Google Apps Marketplace. The Google Apps Guide also describes how to enable or disable some non-core extra Google Apps.  Read More

The C-Suite's Guide to Moving to Google Apps

Google Apps can help improve your business, but it’s important for the C-Suite to prepare for the switch by developing an implementation strategy before the actual switch to Google Apps occurs.

This white paper provides answers for the common questions that may arise before you make the change to Google Apps, and addresses specific areas of concern that each member of the C-Suite might have before and during the system changeover. Learn how to deal with potential issues such as access and security controls, recurring costs, how software as a service (SaaS) functions, and how browser-based access will allow for easier telecommuting. Read in depth about how Google Apps will help your organization with compliance, archiving, document management, and what updates for data sharing and terms of service operations really mean for your business.

Each of the CIO, CFO, CLO, and COO members of the C-Suite may have their own concerns, specific to their areas of expertise. These are addressed as well. Potential and projected overall benefits to each member of the C-Suite as a result of Google Apps implementation are also highlighted. Read this Google Apps white paper as the first step to facilitating a smooth transition. With the development of a strategy across the C-Suite, you’ll maximize the benefits of Google Apps for your entire organization. Read More

You may also be interested in these related documents:

Profiting from PCI Compliance

  • Source: IBM
  • Written By:
  • Published:
Although the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) has become a global requirement, many organizations are lagging in compliance. For many companies, regulatory compliance can already be an overwhelming and confusing area to navigate, and the need to comply with the PCI DSS might feel like yet another burden. Discover the efficiency gains of building a strategy designed around PCI compliance. Read More

Understanding the PCI Data Security Standard

The payment card industry data security standard (PCI DSS) defines a comprehensive set of requirements to enhance and enforce payment account data security in a proactive rather than passive way. These include security management, policies, procedures, network architectures, software design, and other protective measures. Get a better understanding of the PCC DSS and learn the costs and benefits of compliance. Read More

Identity-based NAC: Using Identity to Put the “Control” in Network Access Control

Access control is more than just checking devices for malware before admitting them to a network. Identity-based network access control (NAC) looks at the identities of users and devices, and knows what resource they are authorized to access, allowing enterprises to tightly control access, and the devices and behavior of users. Read More
 
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