Mastering E-discovery: The IT Manager’s Guide to Preservation, Protection, and Production

  • Source: Symantec
  • Written By:
  • Published:
  • (Originally Published On:) )
Formally defining, effectively retaining, and successfully archiving e-mail and other electronic business records is one of the most important tasks facing many organizations today. Learn how to quickly and cost-effectively preserve, protect, and produce legally compliant e-mail and other electronically stored information (ESI) in anticipation of litigation and regulatory audits, with an e-discovery compliance program.

Featured Software Research:

Best Practices for Managing Just-in-time (JIT) Production

Just-in-time (JIT) manufacturing “is not procrastination, but making a commitment once the scales are tipped in the favor of certainty.” How do you keep your company from falling prey to the “deer-in-the-headlights” syndrome and suffering from decision failures? In this guide, experts share their top seven best practices for deftly managing JIT manufacturing. Read More

Dynamic Scheduling: The Missing Link to Mastering Field Mobility?

Source Refrigeration & HVAC needed an automated scheduling solution to round out its mobile initiative for a workforce of nearly 500 field technicians. Ease of integration was a key consideration for Source. Find out why the company found IFS 360 Scheduling's dynamic solution appealing. Read More

You may also be interested in these related documents:

Understanding ESI Technology and Workflows

The advent of powerful yet inexpensive computers and global connectivity has produced data everywhere. Relevant data needs to be identified and brought into court. E-discovery essentially requires a professional approach to managing a project, with application of general principles to the legal world. Read this paper for a review of Electronically Stored Information (ESI) technology used for litigation and e-discovery. Read More

E-discovery: Collecting Evidence or Collecting Sanctions

What constitutes a right or a wrong e-discovery collection process can be subjective, with the last word belonging to a judge. From the attorney’s standpoint, there are only two main varieties of e-discovery collection procedures: copy/sequester and in-place hold (also referred to as hold in-place). This paper discusses the benefits and risks associated with both approaches and explains why copy/sequester is best-practice. Read More
comments powered by Disqus