RFID Technology: Changing Business Dramatically, Today and Tomorrow

  • Source: SAP
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The move to radio frequency identification (RFID) integration may result in high costs, arising from the need to maintain multiple interfaces between RFID and other enterprise systems. This means implementing a software architecture that encompasses current and future technology, combined with a data architecture that enables you to manage massive amounts of data at a low total cost of ownership.

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  • Source: VAI
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As a supplier to Wal-Mart, appliance manufacturer Haier America was required to implement a radio frequency identification (RFID) tagging system. To satisfy this requirement and to keep costs to a minimum, Haier needed a solution that would seamlessly integrate with its current enterprise resource planning (ERP) application. That’s why it turned to a custom-designed modification package. But was it enough for Wal-Mart? Read More

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  • Source: SAP
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