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Sarbanes-Oxley and MAS 90

Source: Shelko Consulting LLC
The Public Company Accounting Reform and Investor Protection Act of 2002 (also known as the Sarbanes-Oxley Act 0f 2002) was passed by US lawmakers to reinforce honest and transparent corporate practices in the wake of the various public accounting scandals and corporate failures of the 1990s. As with any far-reaching legislation of this magnitude, there is plenty of hype that has emerged in connection with this law. This document is designed to help large and small companies navigate some of the “hype” that sometimes blurs the line between fact and fiction.


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