Strategies for Deploying Blade Servers in Existing Data Centers

Blade servers have a major advantage over traditional ones—improving processing ability while using less power per server. But, with their smaller footprint, blades can be much more densely packed, resulting in racks that use up to 20 times the electrical power and generate up to 20 times the heat. This can stress power and cooling system capability. Learn how to create a power and cooling strategy with these guidelines.
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