Strategies for Deploying Blade Servers in Existing Data Centers

Blade servers have a major advantage over traditional ones—improving processing ability while using less power per server. But, with their smaller footprint, blades can be much more densely packed, resulting in racks that use up to 20 times the electrical power and generate up to 20 times the heat. This can stress power and cooling system capability. Learn how to create a power and cooling strategy with these guidelines.

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Understanding ERP Deployment Choices

Enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems were once deployed as monolithic systems running in local data centers. Today, there are a multitude of ERP deployment strategies: single-system, cloud-based, operational, peer, hybrid, and multilevel approaches. Advances in ERP system design, the advent of cloud computing, and the ongoing evolution of business are among the key factors driving this proliferation of choices. Read More

Understanding ERP Deployment Choices

Enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems were once deployed as monolithic systems running in local data centers. Today, there are a multitude of ERP deployment strategies: single-system, cloud-based, operational, peer, hybrid, and multilevel approaches. Advances in ERP system design, the advent of cloud computing, and the ongoing evolution of business are among the key factors driving this proliferation of choices. Read More

Edge Consolidation Delivers Peace of Mind for IT

  • Source: CIO
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To increase agility while lowering costs, information technology (IT) organizations are using virtualization and cloud-based infrastructure services to consolidate and reduce the number of physical servers and data centers across the enterprise. As organizations consolidate data backup and disaster recovery operations, wide-area network (WAN) optimization plays a key role in mitigating risk without sacrificing performance. Find out how to balance data protection and application performance, and... Read More

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Cooling Strategies for Ultra-high Density Racks and Blade Servers

The average power consumed by an enclosure in a data center is about 1.7 kilowatts (kWs), but the maximum power that can be obtained by filling a rack with available high density servers, such as blade servers, is over 20 kW. Find out about the power density values of current and new data centers, and learn practical approaches to creating strategies for deploying high-density computing, with limitations and benefits. Read More

Guidelines for Specification of Data Center Power Density

Conventional methods for specifying data center density don’t provide the guidance to assure predictable power and cooling performance for the latest IT equipment. Discover an improved method that can help assure compatibility with anticipated high-density loads, provide unambiguous instruction for design and installation of power and cooling equipment, prevent oversizing, and maximize electrical efficiency. Read More

Deploying High-density Zones in a Low-density Data Center

New power and cooling technology allows for a simple and rapid deployment of self-contained high-density zones within an existing or new low-density data center. The independence of these high-density zones allows for reliable high-density equipment operation without a negative impact on existing power and cooling infrastructure—and with more electrical efficiency than conventional designs. Learn more now. Read More
 
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