The Advantages of Row- and Rack-oriented Cooling Architectures for Data Centers

The traditional room-oriented approach to data center cooling has limitations in next-generation data centers. Next-generation data centers must adapt to changing requirements, support high and variable power density, and reduce power consumption and other operating costs. Find out how row- and rack-oriented cooling architectures reduce total cost of ownership (TCO), and address the needs of next-generations data centers.

Featured Software Research:

Selecting ERP for Engineer-to-order Manufacturing

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Most enterprise resource planning (ERP) software was not designed for a project-oriented environment like engineer-to-order (ETO). How do the needs of ETO manufacturers differ from more traditional manufacturers? And how can an ETO manufacturer go about selecting ERP software that truly meets their needs for project visibility and control? Download this white paper to find out more. Read More

Databases and ERP Selection: Oracle vs. SQL Server

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The database is an essential component of enterprise applications such as enterprise resource planning (ERP) and enterprise asset management (EAM). This white paper outlines the advantages and disadvantages of the Oracle and Microsoft SQL Server database platforms. How do the two compare when it comes to reliability, scalability, and total cost of ownership (TCO) when integrated with enterprise software? Read More

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Strategies for Deploying Blade Servers in Existing Data Centers

Blade servers have a major advantage over traditional ones—improving processing ability while using less power per server. But, with their smaller footprint, blades can be much more densely packed, resulting in racks that use up to 20 times the electrical power and generate up to 20 times the heat. This can stress power and cooling system capability. Learn how to create a power and cooling strategy with these guidelines. Read More

Energy-efficient Cooling for Data Centers: A Close-coupled Row Solution

Perimeter computer-room air handlers and central air-handling units have been used to cool data centers since the launch of the mainframe. But as rack power grew, air delivery and heat removal challenges appeared. Row-based designs address issues of proper heat removal and cold air supply—and bring energy-efficiency advantages. Learn more about row-based solutions and the benefits they can deliver to your data center. Read More

Cooling Strategies for Ultra-high Density Racks and Blade Servers

The average power consumed by an enclosure in a data center is about 1.7 kilowatts (kWs), but the maximum power that can be obtained by filling a rack with available high density servers, such as blade servers, is over 20 kW. Find out about the power density values of current and new data centers, and learn practical approaches to creating strategies for deploying high-density computing, with limitations and benefits. Read More
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