The Growing Importance of E-discovery on Your Business

E-discovery is the extension of the discovery process to include identifying, preserving, collecting, reviewing, and analyzing electronically stored information. Today, it represents 35 percent of the total cost of litigation. Companies that fail to produce e-mail in a timely manner face paying fines and other risks. Learn how you can develop an e-discovery plan to better manage your electronic data discovery processes.

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An enterprise resource planning (ERP) system is your information backbone, reaching into all areas of your business and value chain. That’s why replacing it can open unlimited business opportunities. The cornerstone of this effort is finding the right partner. And since your long-term business strategy will shape your selection, it’s critical that your ERP provider be part of your vision. Read More

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Understanding ESI Technology and Workflows

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Mastering E-discovery: The IT Manager’s Guide to Preservation, Protection, and Production

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