The Seven Keys to World-class Manufacturing

  • Source: Infor
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What does it mean to be a world-class competitor? It means being successful in your market against any competition—regardless of size or country of origin. It means matching or exceeding any competitor on quality, lead time, cost, customer service, and innovation. It means picking your battles—competing on the terms dictated by you. But how do you get there?

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Best Practices for Managing Just-in-time (JIT) Production

Just-in-time (JIT) manufacturing “is not procrastination, but making a commitment once the scales are tipped in the favor of certainty.” How do you keep your company from falling prey to the “deer-in-the-headlights” syndrome and suffering from decision failures? In this guide, experts share their top seven best practices for deftly managing JIT manufacturing. Read More

Why ERP Fails at Enterprise Project Management

  • Source: IFS
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Because enterprise resource planning (ERP) came from the world of materials planning for repetitive manufacturing, these applications cannot address the more anecdotal, complex, and dynamic requirements of real-time enterprise project management. Even tier one ERP products cannot meet the needs of some companies—engineer-to-order manufacturers, engineering procurement and construction contractors, and even process manufacturers. Read this white paper to learn more. Read More

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The Five Keys to Manufacturing Success: Encouraging Profitable Growth

  • Source: SAP
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These are challenging times for discrete manufacturing, especially for small to midsize companies. To stay competitive and meet rising expectations, manufacturers must seize every opportunity to grow—but wisely and profitably. This white paper presents clear strategies that can help these manufacturers achieve competitive advantage while giving clients the innovative, competitively priced products they demand. Read More

Case Study: Grand Rapids Spring & Stamping

A supplier to the automotive industry, Grand Rapids Spring & Stamping (GRS&S) implemented an innovative continuous improvement program. The goal: to make incremental improvements in quality, cost, delivery, safety, and morale. With over 8,000 employee-generated ideas now implemented, the company has saved over $1.2 million. Learn how improvements in GRS&S’s manufacturing processes reduce waste and improve the bottom line. Read More

Getting Back to Selling

Faced with longer sales cycles, declining sales productivity, and increasingly discerning customers, companies are being forced to streamline and automate how sales information is processed, and change the mechanics of deal-making. Learn more about the strategies that best-in-class (BIC) companies are employing to improve sales effectiveness, boost productivity, and ultimately remain competitive. Read More
 
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