The Use of Ceiling-Ducted Air Containment in Data Centers

Ducting hot IT-equipment exhaust to a drop ceiling can be an effective air management strategy, improving the reliability and energy efficiency of a data center. Typical approaches include ducting either individual racks or entire hot aisles and may be passive (ducting only) or active (include fans). This paper examines available ducting options and explains how such systems should be deployed and operated. Practical cooling limits are established and best-practice recommendations are provided.

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