The Use of Ceiling-Ducted Air Containment in Data Centers

Ducting hot IT-equipment exhaust to a drop ceiling can be an effective air management strategy, improving the reliability and energy efficiency of a data center. Typical approaches include ducting either individual racks or entire hot aisles and may be passive (ducting only) or active (include fans). This paper examines available ducting options and explains how such systems should be deployed and operated. Practical cooling limits are established and best-practice recommendations are provided.

Featured Software Research:

Understanding ERP Deployment Choices

Enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems were once deployed as monolithic systems running in local data centers. Today, there are a multitude of ERP deployment strategies: single-system, cloud-based, operational, peer, hybrid, and multilevel approaches. Advances in ERP system design, the advent of cloud computing, and the ongoing evolution of business are among the key factors driving this proliferation of choices. Read More

Understanding ERP Deployment Choices

Enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems were once deployed as monolithic systems running in local data centers. Today, there are a multitude of ERP deployment strategies: single-system, cloud-based, operational, peer, hybrid, and multilevel approaches. Advances in ERP system design, the advent of cloud computing, and the ongoing evolution of business are among the key factors driving this proliferation of choices. Read More

Making the Business Case for Analytics in the Mid-Market

To build a strong business case for investing in analytics, mid-size companies need to overcome common barriers to adoption, and focus on value propositions that align with revenue growth and cost containment. The use cases captured in this paper demonstrate the value that organizations have realized in sales, risk management, and corporate reporting through analytics.  Read More

You may also be interested in these related documents:

Strategies for Deploying Blade Servers in Existing Data Centers

Blade servers have a major advantage over traditional ones—improving processing ability while using less power per server. But, with their smaller footprint, blades can be much more densely packed, resulting in racks that use up to 20 times the electrical power and generate up to 20 times the heat. This can stress power and cooling system capability. Learn how to create a power and cooling strategy with these guidelines. Read More

The Advantages of Row- and Rack-oriented Cooling Architectures for Data Centers

The traditional room-oriented approach to data center cooling has limitations in next-generation data centers. Next-generation data centers must adapt to changing requirements, support high and variable power density, and reduce power consumption and other operating costs. Find out how row- and rack-oriented cooling architectures reduce total cost of ownership (TCO), and address the needs of next-generations data centers. Read More

Deploying High-density Zones in a Low-density Data Center

New power and cooling technology allows for a simple and rapid deployment of self-contained high-density zones within an existing or new low-density data center. The independence of these high-density zones allows for reliable high-density equipment operation without a negative impact on existing power and cooling infrastructure—and with more electrical efficiency than conventional designs. Learn more now. Read More
 
comments powered by Disqus