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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail
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 2010 articles dealing with supply and demand


Five Ways to Positively Impact Customer Retention and Business Operations
Maintaining strong business performance and retaining loyal customers requires continual vigilance and assessment. Establishing metrics that focus on value

2010 articles dealing with supply and demand  Ways to Positively Impact Customer Retention and Business Operations Leading customer-focused companies view every customer interaction as an opportunity to make a new offer, improve retention, increase revenue, build loyalty, or strengthen their brand. Infor CRM Epiphany helps companies optimize customer relationships by integrating marketing, sales, and service. By providing a full 360-degree view of customers, the system enables a consistent and continuous customer dialogue based on real-time

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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail

We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.

Get free sample report
Compare Software Solutions

Visit the TEC store to compare leading software by functionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.

Compare Now

Documents related to » 2010 articles dealing with supply and demand

BI State of the Market Report


IT departments rarely know as much about a business as the business people themselves. But business people rarely take action on numbers alone: they share the information with others, soliciting their feedback and performing external research before taking action. Business users still depend on IT to deliver answers related to the information that they receive. Business intelligence (BI) 2.0—also known as collaborative BI—uses the collective intelligence of the user community to enrich existing information. Learn how business intelligence (BI) 2.0 is helping business users create and modify their own reports, share and enrich information, and provide feedback to each other and to information producers.

When the community helps itself, information is turned into actionable information more quickly than when using purely “traditional” methods of community support, such as meetings, phone calls, and e-mail. And when actions are taken more quickly, the entire organization becomes more nimble and ultimately more competitive. This overview discusses how BI 2.0 can provide real benefits within your organization and what product features to look for in a BI solution in order to realize those benefits.

We hope you’ll find this guide a useful tool in determining which BI solution is best suited to your company’s business model and particular needs.


Table of Contents


Executive Overview
Using BI 2.0 to Increase your Competitive Advantage

Case Study
LogiXML Helps to Power its Real-Estate Reporting and Analysis

Thought Leadership
How Smart Marketers Succeed Online

Market Insight
Mashups and Pervasive BI

Report Sponsors
LogiXML

IBM

About TEC



Download the full copy of the TEC 2009 BI Buyer’s Guide for businesses.



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Using BI 2.0 to Increase Your Competitive Advantage


Business users know their data better than IT does. They know the meaning of the data, its history, and its relationship with other data. Yet traditional BI solutions have business users referring to IT for assistance with their data. Also, they are forced to work in silos. Sure, they can create their own reports and maybe even share them with other business users, but when it comes to sharing their own knowledge about the data, they have to rely on e-mail, telephone, and face-to-face meetings. By enabling the sharing of data-related knowledge through the BI system itself, business users become more self-sufficient and actions can be taken more quickly.

The raison d’être of BI is to provide business users with information that enables them to take action. Even if business users are self-sufficient when it comes to creating and sharing data, data on its own is rarely sufficient to take action. Identifying an opportunity in the market through numbers alone is not sufficient to justify investment in a new product or geography. Identifying a bottleneck in a business process is not sufficient to justify changes in the business process. Information about a business issue or opportunity is merely a part of the overall “solution domain.” Action is usually only taken after considering a number of factors in addition to the data, such as human knowledge and experience, the economic environment, and the competitive environment.

In this section, we lay out the capabilities to look for in a BI solution—and specific functional requirements needed to support these capabilities—that contribute to the goal of “harnessing collective intelligence.” In general, the more recent entrants into the BI market are paying the most attention to BI 2.0. Some vendors, such as Good Data, have it as a central component of their solution offerings.

The following are key capabilities of BI 2.0:

  • Collaboration
    Business users are able to share information within the user community and create discussion threads relating to the information.


  • Identification of useful information
    Business users can flag information that is likely to be of use to others within the community.


  • Enriching of Information
    Business users can enrich the information through their knowledge and experience in addition to other external information sources in order to explain trends and generally assist other consumers of that information.


The community of “business users” needn’t be restricted to internal users. User collaboration is already mature within the Web space, under the guise of Web 2.0. With Web 2.0, collective intelligence is harnessed through comments on blog posts; contributions to wikis such as Wikipedia; and tagging of content, such as photos on Flickr. BI 2.0 takes these methods and applies them in the BI space by making data the focus of user collaboration.

The following sections take the capabilities above and list the functional requirements that support them. Bear in mind that each of these functional requirements is a business user requirement and not an IT or development requirement.


Download the full copy of the TEC 2009 BI Buyer’s Guide for businesses.

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The Competitive Supply Chain


Streamlining your supply chain can boost revenue, reduce costs, and help grow your business. No matter what business you’re in, the days of managing your supply chain from the back office are over. Today’s successful companies understand that lean supply chains maximize revenue and help stimulate growth—and their top executives aren’t afraid to wield their supply chains like weapons.

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CRM: Creating a Credible Business Case and Positioning It with the CEO Part Two: Linking CRM with Organizational Direction


An effective business case must link CRM with achieving organizational objectives; but this step is just the beginning. Credibility implies that the document clearly delineates assumptions regarding cause and effect plus the mechanism that will be used to assess results and declare success.

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E2open Gets More High-tech Supply Chain Clout via SERUS


E2open, a provider of cloud-based supply chain network connectivity, business process management (BPM), and analytics solutions, recently acquired SERUS Corporation, supplier of extended supply chain management (SCM) solutions for high tech companies.

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Upgrade with Confidence: Keep Budget and Schedule on Track with Data as a Service


Enterprise resource planning (ERP) upgrades are necessary, but they too often exceed budget and schedule. Technologies in the emerging Data-as-a-Service (DaaS) category promise to accelerate data delivery and reduce infrastructure requirements. DaaS eliminates time, cost, and risk associated with these business-critical projects.

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Every Organization Values Supply Chain Visibility but Sharing Information Can Be a Dangerous Proposition


To achieve a high level of supply chain transparency, companies must share their technology systems and data with many suppliers, distributors, transportation carriers, and channel partners that bring their products to market. This information may be seen by thousands worldwide. While there are doubtless benefits to be achieved, increased data sharing also carries an inherent level of risk. Know how to manage these risks.

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Managing Supply Chain Disruption with Continuous Design


Natural disasters, customer bankruptcies, product recalls . . . there are dozens of unexpected events that can wreak havoc on your global supply chain. Are you prepared to react swiftly to these contingencies? A continuous supply chain design is a new concept that is emerging to help companies succeed in the face of the unexpected. See how you can design the supply chain around both long-term goals and short-term realities.

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N-Tier Demand Management


The classic bull-whip effect means that the further a supplier is removed from the end consumer, the worse are the fluctuations in demand that they see. This has led many to recommend an n-tier approach to demand management, where everyone gets visibility to the end-customer demand at the same time. In practice, very few companies have been able to actually realize this vision. There are some practical approaches that a few leading suppliers deep in the supply chain are have taken to successfully mitigate the bull-whip effect.

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Top Supply Chain Management Software Compared


Find out which supply chain management solutions really meet the needs of your company with TEC's free SCM comparison reports.

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The Demand-Driven Supply Chain and Demantra


Demand-driven supply chains focus on pulling demand and maximizing effectiveness and profitability while traditional supply chains push products and create efficiencies. This difference is the key to improving all supply chain processes and generating significant cost savings and growth.

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