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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail
We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.
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 accounting entries for contracts in progress


Project-oriented versus Generic GL-oriented ERP/Accounting Systems
Caught between big-vendor ERP offerings requiring heavy customization, and off-the-shelf project management solutions that are easily outgrown, project-oriented

accounting entries for contracts in progress  back-office business functions. These accounting and business functions such as general ledger, accounts payable, accounts receivable, materials management, and human resources, are supported through the use of software applications designed to address the special needs of project-oriented organizations. Like other businesses, project-oriented and professional services organizations are also demanding solutions that allow them to combine their business software applications into a single integrated,

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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail

We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.

Get free sample report
Compare Software Solutions

Visit the TEC store to compare leading software by functionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.

Compare Now

Maintenance, Repair, and Overhaul (MRO) RFI/RFP Template

Maintenance Management, Customer Contracts (Agreements), Customer Orders, Customer Quotations, Work Orders, Product Technology 

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Managed Hosting in Europe: A Review of the Managed Hosting Market and Suppliers in Europe


The increasing use of virtualization allowed managed hosting providers to reduce costs by sharing infrastructure between customers, creating the earliest versions of what is now known as cloud computing. Platforms managed by specialists provide higher service levels, greater ease of secure access, and more manageable costs than many companies can achieve internally. Discover more about Europe’s managed hosting market.

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Smaller Vendors Can Still Provide Relevant Business Systems Part Three: Project Oriented Organizations


The unique business needs of project-oriented organizations, when addressed by large ERP vendors that offer general-purpose enterprise software, typically require heavy customization in order to work. On the other hand, when project-oriented organizations turn to small off-the-shelf project-management solutions, these solutions are soon outgrown by the user company.

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SaaS Buyer's Guide for Wholesale and Distribution


SaaS, despite its phenomenal popularity, is certainly not one-size-fits-all. You need to consider decision criteria such as fit, return on investment, and risk. Learn how SaaS works, who the major vendors are, how SaaS can help your business grow, and how to find the SaaS solution that’s right for you. It’s all in this comprehensive SaaS Buyer’s Guide for Wholesale and Distribution from TEC and SupplyChainBrain.

From a business requirements perspective, the defining characteristic of wholesale and distribution (W&D) organizations is that they operate as intermediate agents between manufacturers and retailers. Their top business needs thus focus on requirements for:

  • processing high volumes of transactions,
  • maintaining constant communication between upstream and downstream collaborators (manufacturers and retailers/customers, respectively), and
  • managing products for multiple competitors within the same warehouse or distribution center

In this guide we will explore considerations for W&D organizations that are considering adoption of the SaaS delivery model, and examine the particular business issues that arise from this change.Specifically, we will address the following considerations:

  • the differences between SaaS and on-premise delivery models
  • SaaS architectures
  • SaaS pros, cons, and other considerations
  • selection criteria for SaaS-based applications
  • viable wholesale and distribution SaaS vendors

Later in this guide, we’ll provide examples of SaaS delivery model success stories, as well as a SaaS IT directory, segmented according to business area.


Table of Contents


Preface

Software as a Service: A Buyer’s Guide


Spotlight on Adaptability and Agility

Thought Leadership from SAP
SAP’s Perspective on Software as a Service

SAP Case Study
Johnson Products Capitalizing on New Sales after 30-day SAP Deployment


Spotlight on Manufacturing and Distribution

Thought Leadership from Epicor
SaaS ERP for Small Manufacturers and Distributors

TECSYS Case Study
LifeScience Logistics Achieves 99.97% Inventory Accuracy with TECYS’ EliteSeries for Healthcare


Spotlight on Growing Your Company with SaaS

Thought Leadership from NetSuite
The Benefits of a Business Management Software Suite for High-growth and Midsized Businesses: Overcoming the Barriers of Stand-alone Business Applications

NetSuite Case Study
Woodworking Machinery Maker Cuts Costs, Grows Efficiency with NetSuite

NetSuite Case Study
NetSuite Helps Manufacturer Take Advantage of Fast Market Growth


Spotlight on Distribution Centers

Thought Leadership from Bond International Software
Cloud Computing for Your Distribution Workforce

IBS Case Study
Konaflex Focuses on its Core Business with IBS Distribution Management Software


Vendor Directory


Download the full copy of the TEC 2010 SaaS Buyer’s Guide for wholesale and distribution.



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What Are the Differences between the SaaS and On-premise Delivery Models?



Defining the on-premise delivery model is relatively straightforward:

  • The software is acquired by the customer up-front.
  • The software is installed, deployed, managed, and maintained at the customer’s site, generally with a great degree of involvement by the customer.
  • The customer provides the in-house infrastructure (e.g., servers, hardware, networks) to support the software.


Defining the SaaS model is slightly more complex, since different SaaS vendors offer different definitions. We’ll explore these variations in more detail shortly, but for now we’ll note the following SaaS characteristics:

  • The software vendor provides customers with access to the software via the Internet.
  • The customer pays for this service on a subscription basis (normally per user, per month, or per number of transactions).
  • The vendor is responsible for maintenance, upgrades, and software support, as well as the supporting infrastructure.

The major difference between the on-premise and SaaS delivery model lies in the ownership of the software. In the on-premise model, once the software is purchased, the customer owns it. In the SaaS delivery model, the software is not owned by the customer: it is provided to the customer in the same manner as any other service.


Download the full copy of the TEC 2010 SaaS Buyer’s Guide for wholesale and distribution.

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Deltek's Second Bite at the IPO Cherry (Part III)


Part II of this blog series analyzed the relatively recently launched Deltek EPM suite, which came as a result of three focused acquisitions. It also analyzed the suite's resulting potential cross- and up-sell opportunities and its prospective additional revenue for Deltek in a standalone manner. However, Deltek has not been sitting still when it comes to continually enhancing its core products

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SAP Business All-in-One


Through the SAP Business All-in-One platform, people in businesses around the globe are improving relationships with customers and partners, streamlining operations, and achieving significant efficiencies throughout their supply chains. Today, more than 17,000 companies in over 120 countries run more than 44,500 installations of SAP software.  

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Charting a Better Course for Your Business: Eight Rules for Investing in a New Accounting System


A good financial and accounting system should propel your business forward. It should give you the specific insights you need to spot the storms ahead, help you maximize resources with streamlined processes, and be nimble enough to help you navigate the changing currents of today’s business environment. Download this white paper to make sure you have the facts straight about what to look for—and what to look out for.

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ERP for Services (Non-manufacturing)


Typically, ERP systems designed for services industries offer modules that provide back-office support, customer relationship management, time management, expense management, resource management, and project management capabilities. Depending on the vertical market, additional industry-specific functionality may be included to address unique business requirements. Consequently, project-centric systems for accounting, architecture, construction, engineering, and professional services industries will support project management functionality; whereas health care, field service, distribution, and government systems will support functionality unique to those vertical markets.

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CYMA IV Accounting for Windows


CYMAIV Accounting for Windows is a family of accounting software systems designed specifically for Windows users (98, ME, NT, 2000, 2003 Server). The software includes the following modules: Accounts Payable, Accounts Receivable, After-The-Fact Payroll (Client Write-Up), Bank Reconciliation, General Ledger, Job Costing, Payroll, Purchase Order, System Manager. Integrated third party add-ons include: State Payroll Forms, MICR Check Package, Crystal Reports, F9.  

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Core PLM for Process Industries


The foundation of product lifecycle management (PLM) for the process (or recipe-based) manufacturing industries is product data management (PDM). It covers design and product-related aspects of PLM including management of material specifications, recipes, formulas, production processes, design tools, document management, and collaboration.

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Best-in-class Marketers Drive Enhanced Customer Loyalty


The path to a complete view of the customer lies not in eliminating data sources but in integrating them and providing access that is easy to navigate and always available. This report explores how top-performing companies are capturing, integrating, managing, measuring, and acting on valuable customer data throughout the entire customer lifecycle, to maximize customer loyalty and achieve best-in-class bottom-line results.

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