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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail
We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.
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 analytical case studies


Choosing Between Linux and Microsoft Windows Using an Analytical Hierarchy Process
Because small to medium enterprises are limited in their resources, they must carefully consider which of the two major operating systems available—Microsoft

analytical case studies  and empirical approach. Using analytical hierarchy process (AHP), I have built the hierarchy (see figure 1) with the overall model showing a top-down approach. As a tool, Expert Choice software was used. The hierarchy is derived from various reviews of TCO studies, and it is further expanded to include elements that have not been considered in prior research. These elements are subcategories of deployment, patch management, compatibility, patch availability, and warranty nodes. Part Two of the series

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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail

We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.

Get free sample report
Compare Software Solutions

Visit the TEC store to compare leading software by functionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.

Compare Now

Process Manufacturing (ERP)

The simplified definition of enterprise resource planning (ERP) software is a set of applications that automate finance and human resources departments and help manufacturers handle jobs such as order processing and production scheduling. ERP began as a term used to describe a sophisticated and integrated software system used for manufacturing. In its simplest sense, ERP systems create interactive environments designed to help companies manage and analyze the business processes associated with manufacturing goods, such as inventory control, order taking, accounting, and much more. Although this basic definition still holds true for ERP systems, today its definition is expanding. Today's leading ERP systems group all traditional company management functions (finance, sales, manufacturing, human resources) and include, with varying degrees of acceptance and skill, many solutions that were formerly considered peripheral (product data management (PDM), warehouse management, manufacturing execution system (MES), reporting, etc.). While during the last few years the functional perimeter of ERP systems began an expansion into its adjacent markets, such as supply chain management (SCM), customer relationship management (CRM), business intelligence/data warehousing, and e-Business, the focus of this knowledge base is mainly on the traditional ERP realms of finance, materials planning, and human resources. The old adage is "Such a beginning, such an end", and, consequently, many ERP systems' failures could be traced back to a bad software selection. The foundation of any ERP implementation must be a proper exercise of aligning customers' IT technology with their business strategy, and subsequent software selection. This is the perfect time to create the business case and energize the entire organization towards the vision sharing and a buy in, both being the Key Success Factors (KSFs). Yet, these steps are very often neglected despite the amount of expert literature and articles that emphasize their importance.    

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Documents related to » analytical case studies

A One-stop Event for Business Intelligence and Data Warehousing Information


The Data Warehousing Institute (TDWI) hosts quarterly World Conferences to help organizations involved in data warehousing, business intelligence, and performance management. These conferences supply a wealth of information aimed at improving organizational decision-making, optimizing performance, and achieving business objectives.

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Justification of ERP Investments Part Two: The Intangible Effects of ERP


The intangible or non-financial benefits of an integrated enterprise resource planning (ERP) system can be viewed from several perspectives. For illustrative purposes, the discussion will focus on the benefits for accounting, product and process design, production, sales, and management information system MIS functions. From the overall company standpoint, ERP provides a framework for working effectively together and providing a consistent plan for action. Reprinted from Maximizing Your ERP System by Dr. Scott Hamilton.

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CRM, Success, and Best Practices: A Wake Up Call Part One: Searching and Establishing the Business Parameters of CRM


Customer relationship management is a sophisticated set of customer-facing tools; however, its technology has outpaced the management strategy used to implement it. Moreover, murky definitions and objectives have caused varying degrees of success and failure to emerge from the same initiative. Clearly defining the objective, implementing holistic best practices, and ensuring that senior management understands CRM as a business strategy can help maximize a CRM investment.

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Assessing the Drivers of Sales Performance


Outmoded measures are being used to develop marketing strategies and allocate resources. Existing go to market models often fail to consider the customer's total experience, and provides little information for planning. The solution is to reorient performance metrics to become value-driven.

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Case Study: Sanimax


Microsoft Dynamics AX enterprise resource planning (ERP) software for process, discrete, and mixed-mode manufacturers delivers the capabilities needed to help achieve compliance, efficiency, and quality requirements, plus meet customer satisfaction and profitability goals.

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Case Study: Calnetix


Running four manufacturing operations simultaneously was a challenge for California (US)-based Calnetix. The company needed an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system to help it manage its information, as well as control inventory and track sampling time. The ERP solution Calnetix chose has brought greater efficiencies in purchasing, and tracking work orders and inventory—and helps Calnetix meet due dates. Learn more.

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Case Study: Zurn


Due to acquisitions, Zurn—manufacturer and distributor of plumbing products—was running three disparate enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems. Financial reporting and data sharing across business units was time-consuming. To handle current and future business needs, Zurn wanted an integrated ERP system that would provide up-to-date accounting, sales, and warehouse data. Find out about the integrated ERP Zurn chose.

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Case Study: IGX Global Corp


IGX Global provides solutions to develop, deploy, and sustain effective long-term network and information security plans. This case study identifies the business issues that IGX Global was able to overcome using FinancialForce supply chain management (SCM). Learn about the project results.

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Case Study: UEM




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Case Study: Widex


Widex Canada, a manufacturer and distributor of high-end hearing aids, wanted to automate its work flow—from sales order entry through shipping and delivery. It also wanted more flexible reporting accounting and sales. Learn how combining Microsoft® Dynamics NAV with Tectura’s Configure to Order and Workflow helped Widex make its day-to-day processes more efficient and report results quickly and accurately.

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