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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail
We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.
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 analytical writing examples


A Demand-driven Approach to BI
The core concept behind the Vanguard solution is that business intelligence (BI) must be demand-driven, which means that the business needs of the user dictate

analytical writing examples  the majority of the analytical processing of content occurs off-line on the user's PC, rather than over a network connection. Vanguard's user environments enable business people to filter, drill-down, modify, and preview the customized Information Views, whereby the level of customization and end-user control is such that the user very rarely needs to generate live queries against the relational databases. This also significantly increases the scalability of the solution by delivering compressed data

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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail

We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.

Get free sample report
Compare Software Solutions

Visit the TEC store to compare leading software by functionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.

Compare Now

Learning Management Suite (LMS)

These are tools for managing, creating, scheduling training or learning in your organization. The terminology varies from vendor to vendor. Learning management systems (LMS) typically help to manage both classroom and on-line learning. They do not normally include content creation or management tools but may in some cases. Some LMSs may manage just classroom or just e-learning rather than both. Some LMSs may also include content authoring and managment and virtual classrooms. Learning content management systems (LCMS) emphasize the management of content for courses/training/learning. In most cases, they include content authoring tools. In some cases, they may also include some of the features of LMSs. Content authoring tools are often provided as part of an LCMS. They may also be stand-alone products. Virtual classrooms (web conferencing tools) normally are separate third party offerings but may be included as part of a suite of tools. Suites of tools include features of at least two or more of the above categories. While some companies offer just LMS or LCMS systems others offer suites of products, which provide all or most of the features of the other tools. Suites combine several capabilities of learning management--usually two or more of the following: learning management, classroom training management, e-learning management, custom content creation, learning content management, learning object repositories, or virtual classrooms.  

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Supply Chain Collaboration: The Key to Success in a Global Economy


Outsourcing and global competition are forcing companies to transform their supply chains from linear processes into adaptive networks. Communities of customer-centric, demand-driven companies must share knowledge in order to adapt to changing markets, and respond to shorter life cycles. Discover how supply chain management (SCM) solutions can help your company create a truly adaptive and collaborative supply network.

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Workforce Analytics: Changing and Winning the Game


Human resources (HR) is an increasingly strategic player in gaining a competitive advantage, especially in terms of workforce analytics. But HR organizations struggle when they spend too much time gathering data instead of acting on it. By implementing a comprehensive workforce analytics solution, they will start to win the "changing game" and—more importantly—drive corporate results that matter.

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Talent Management: The New Business Imperative


Studies and statistics suggest that, because of demographic trends, companies will soon face a shortage of talent. In response, many companies have begun adopting processes and tools to more effectively recruit, retain, and develop talent. At the top of the list are human capital management (HCM) and talent management systems. Find out how these new technologies can help your company survive the coming talent crunch.

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Compliance Exposures in ERP Systems Part 1


This paper examines key issues for CFOs and CEOs in managing ERP systems in the new world of SOX, IFRS, Basle II. While most IT management attention seems to be on document retention, reporting quality, and security, there are broader issues to be considered toward ensuring good governance and compliance with regulations such as Sarbanes-Oxley, IFRS and Basle II.

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The Shortcut Guide to Achieving Business Intelligence in Midsize Companies


This guide introduces you to the key concepts of business intelligence, including data modeling, data warehouses, online analytical processing (OLAP), and more. The author debunks many of the prevailing myths that scare small to medium businesses from investigating the use of business intelligence, and explains how the very same techniques and technologies used by massive enterprises are now available to them.

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CRM is Busting Out Of Its Britches: Operational, Analytical, and Collaborative CRM Are Born


Back in the early 90’s, ‘CRM’ wasn’t even a trendy acronym. You had a few players thinking beyond 'stovepipe' enterprise applications, but not much beyond. Fast forward to 2001. CRM has gotten fat, and the fatter it gets, it becomes more difficult to understand, more expensive to buy, more difficult to implement, and less likely to satisfy - either buyers of the software or their customers. Keep your eye on the ball: your customers, and your business.

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TDWI Conference in Chicago: The BI-cycle Still Running


Recently, I attended the TDWI Conference in Chicago. This conference was a great opportunity to learn insights from the people who are involved in the industry. In each conference, it’s always interesting to see how the BI sector has matured. The interest in gaining more and more control and improvement in the BI terrain is still a growing process. I’m glad to know there is still a lot to say

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The Truth about Data Mining


It is now imperative that businesses be prudent. With rising volumes of data, traditional analytical techniques may not be able to discover valuable data. Consequently, data mining technology becomes important. Here is a framework to help understand the data mining process.

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Agile ERP Vendor Ditches a Microsoft Dynamics CRM Alliance for, well, its own CRM Solution (Part I)


Writing about failed partnerships in the enterprise applications market is like writing about the sun setting in the evening and to the west, given almost daily occurrences of vendors announcing alliances that never materialize. However, it doesn't happen every day that a potential high-profile alliance gets called off at the 11th hour and in favor of an overlooked in-house solution. The

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The Subjective Criteria of ERP Selection


I hope our readers, to greater or lesser degrees, are familiar with our business software selection methodology—as we have been writing a lot on this matter. But the lion’s share of these publications often refer to either the functional or technical sides of the selection process, or what type of business processes a future system can support and how can be achieved. Here, I would like

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