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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail
We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.
Get free sample report

Compare Software Solutions
Visit the TEC store to compare leading software solutions by funtionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.
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 asw 5 50


IBS-Slow but Steady (and Demand-Driven) May Win the SCM Race
IBS, a conservative Swedish enterprise resource planning and supply chain management, seems to be making right moves to remain the leader within its selected

asw 5 50  Part Two will present ASW features. Part Three will discuss the market impact. Part Four will cover warehousing, challenges, and make user recommendations. Acquisitions and Divestitures IBS is expanding through selected acquisitions and in July 2005 announced its acquisition of an Iberian software company QUATRO Information Systems (Quatro) . Quatro has 95 employees and 500 customers in Portugal and Spain and specializes in logistics and warehouse management. In 2004, Quatro had net sales of 9 million

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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail

We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.

Get free sample report
Compare Software Solutions

Visit the TEC store to compare leading software by functionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.

Compare Now

Documents related to » asw 5 50

TEC's Mid-market ERP-Distribution Buyer’s Guide


Midsize manufacturers and distributors now have access to an array of powerful software solutions that simply weren’t available before. But with so many choices, you need accurate and unbiased information. This comprehensive guide from TEC and SupplyChainBrain provides a state-of-the-market analysis, success stories from your peers, in-depth information on solutions, and a directory of the leading vendors in the field.

This guide features information on vendors offering dedicated ERP-distribution solutions for the midmarket. These solutions are all designed to address the logistical, financial, and workflow issues facing the distribution industry today.

Inside, you’ll find a chart highlighting 10 featured vendor solutions by installed base and business components, ranging from warehouse, transportation, and inventory management, to international trade logistics, Web commerce, and human resources (HR) and financials.

As well, you’ll find an analysis of the state of the market by the editor of Supply Chain Brain. Customer success stories have been included to illustrate how ERP-distribution solutions have helped companies like yours solve distribution and business logistics problems.

For your convenience, there’s also a vendor directory to assist companies looking for either full ERP-distribution systems, add-ons, or third-party solutions for the following: demand management (DM), retail systems, supply chain management (SCM), transportation management systems (TMSs), and warehouse management systems (WMSs).

We hope you’ll find this guide a useful tool in determining which ERP-distribution solutions are best suited for your company’s business model and particular needs.


Table of Contents


Introduction

State of the Midsize ERP-Distribution Marketplace

Methodology

Vendor Capabilities

Business Components

Customer Profile

Spotlight on ERP-Distribution

Executive Summary

Customer Success Stories

Spotlight on Inventory and Accounting

Executive Summary

Customer Success Stories

Spotlight on Supply Chain Management

Executive Summary

Customer Success Stories

Vendor Directory

Profiles

Demand Management

ERP-Distribution

Retail

Supply Change Management

Transportation Management System

Warehouse Management System


Download the full copy of the TEC ERP-Distribution Buyer’s Guide for the Mid-market.


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Inventory Management and Accounting Conundrum


The challenges of inventory management and the notion of inventory as a “necessary evil” (or the “asset versus liability” dilemma) have long been haunting operations and financial and accounting managers. It is a well-known fact that managing inventory risk is about managing the cost of maintaining unnecessarily high levels of inventory against the risk of running out of stock at a crucial moment of truth when a customer actually wants something. In a variety of aspects, inventory management is at the heart of the supply chain management (SCM) realm. Supply chain organizations are responsible for all the processes from sales and operations planning to customer fulfillment, inventory optimization, and new product delivery and introduction—all of which involve the planning and movement of inventory. Profit margins are also directly proportional to operational excellence in each of the above processes.
While cherished by material management folks as supply chain “grease,” inventory is not that beloved by financial managers.

The motto “time is money” certainly holds true when it comes to inventory valuation. Well, maybe in a reverse (negative) manner, because typically neglected in the continuous battle for executives’ focus and priority is the management of at-risk, aging inventory—be it excess active, obsolete, returns, or refurbished inventory. Some refer to these items as “slobs,” which stands for “slow moving and obsolete” ones. In other words, most companies in the sectors of high-tech, consumer electronics, retail, and consumer packaged goods (CPG) are focused on new product introductions. Given that everybody is most excited in the early stages of product life cycles (that is, devising and delivering the brand new, “coolest” products), much less attention is paid to the languishing, “totally so not cool” older product lines, with millions of accompanying inventory asset recovery dollars slipping away annually as a consequence.

Excess inventory, which ties up working capital and whose value is declining by the day, does not necessarily come from new product introductions only. Nowadays the manufacture of most goods is largely carried out in the Far East, which comes with a nominal item price advantage, but also with many potential downsides. In addition to the inevitable quality, communication, and cultural issues, manufacturing product in such lower cost, remote locations means a sizeable lead time increase, as the goods will need to be transported from the Far East back to the company’s warehouse. This in turn means that a planner will have to forecast the demand before placing an order with a remote supplier far away.

Download the full copy of the TEC ERP-Distribution Buyer’s Guide for the Mid-market.

asw 5 50   Read More

Winning IT Strategies for Automotive Sales and Aftersales


The global automotive and wholesale distribution industry moves more than 50 million motor vehicles from factory floor to dealer to customer every year. Companies that operate in this market sector perform a difficult balancing act between the vehicle makers on the one side and the dealers and the consumers on the other. However by leveraging IT strategies, their goals are attainable.

asw 5 50   Read More

SYSPRO ERP Bolstered with Voyage & Container Tracking Capabilities


The container shipping industry is a massive $150 billion market, and the implications of even small shipping changes can be enormous, especially to mid-market manufacturers and distributors. SYSPRO USA has launched a new supply chain management (SCM) solution for global manufacturers and distributors called Voyage & Container Tracking.

asw 5 50   Read More

Scaling SAN Connectivity on VMware


VMware and blade servers have taken the IT world by storm. Virtual server use has grown over 50 percent, and blade servers account for 12.5 percent of all new servers. Can you incorporate them into your existing frameworks? Yes. Routers can scale server numbers with virtual interfaces, and with fibre channel storage area network (SAN) connectivity, you can reduce testing and development costs in VMware environments.

asw 5 50   Read More

ecFood Approaches Profitability - An Internet Trading Exchange Bright Spot


Focused on the sourcing needs of the food and beverage industry, ecFood has announced $50 million in transactions during the first quarter of 2001 with its sights set on profitability by the end of the year.

asw 5 50   Read More

ERP Demand Being Re-heated


As reported on March 5 in The Dallas Morning News/KRTBN -- E-commerce may get all the attention, but information technology experts say the demand for enterprise resource planning professionals is almost as hot.

asw 5 50   Read More

Case Study: KLM Catering Services Serves Up Meals Faster and More Efficiently


KLM Catering Services (KCS) Schiphol prepares and delivers 45,000 meals a day for 12 airlines, 350 flights, and 50 different types of aircraft. KCS also manages non-food supplies such as beverages, sales trolleys, and navigation bags to the private airport lounges in Schiphol Airport. Find out why it’s achieving a delivery performance of over 99 percent.

asw 5 50   Read More

Top 5 Security Tips for 2009


In the white paper top 5 security tips for 2009, discover what smaller companies like yours can do to protect themselves from security threats that...

asw 5 50   Read More

DevonWay


 DevonWay has become a leading provider of Cloud-based Continuous Improvement and Asset Management Apps to Fortune 500 customers across industries as diverse as Energy, Government, and Construction. Its Cloud-hosted, platform-based applications are designed to be highly configurable, easy to use, quick to deploy, available on mobile devices, and easy to integrate with legacy systems provided by vendors like SAP, IBM Maximo, ABB|Ventyx, and Oracle. The flexibility and low barrier of entry inherent in DevonWay Apps provide the fastest path to enhanced efficiency, lower operating costs, improved regulatory compliance, safer operations, and increased asset optimization.

asw 5 50   Read More

College Cuts Cost 50 Percent, Boosts Productivity 75 Percent


Villa Maria College tried both minicomputer-based and UNIX-based student information and administrative systems, and saw high costs and inflexible performance. To solve these problems, it migrated to the Comprehensive Academic Management System from Three Rivers Systems. Find out why.

asw 5 50   Read More