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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail
We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.
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 bi reporting architecture


Reporting Tools
Analysis and reporting services are an important part of the enterprise resource planning process. Microsoft Dynamics NAV has been designed to give users

bi reporting architecture  ERP market is its ability to provide reporting solutions for users. By combining Microsoft Dynamics NAV with other options offered by Microsoft or by building/customizing new solutions, Microsoft Dynamics NAV can provide an effective ERP solution. The following whitepaper describes how this is done. Options for analysis and report building, possibilities for customization, and an outline of various packaged solutions are presented. What Is Analysis with Microsoft Dynamics NAV? Analysis and reporting capab

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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail

We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.

Get free sample report
Compare Software Solutions

Visit the TEC store to compare leading software by functionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.

Compare Now

Business Intelligence (BI) RFI / RFP Template

Reporting and Analysis, Analytics, Data Warehousing, Workflow, Data Integration, Support, and System Requirements  

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Documents related to » bi reporting architecture

Reporting Tools versus Business Intelligence


Reporting has been significant to businesses by providing a platform for users to get immediate access to business information via using simple analysis. However, business intelligence (BI) caters to strategic, tactical, and operational needs, providing a platform for comprehensive performance management. Compare standard reports and BI in terms of functionality, capability, architecture, process, and management benefits.

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How Does Your ERP System Architecture Address Change?


In today’s competitive market, businesses are living in a constant state of change—especially in the services sector, which has to contend with a more fluid “people resource” factor. Yet most installed ERP solutions are falling short. Why are nearly half of all businesses essentially blowing their annual ERP budgets to support change? And what are software vendors doing about it? Find out now, in TEC’s 2008 Market Comparison Report.

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A Demand-driven Approach to BI


The core concept behind the Vanguard solution is that business intelligence (BI) must be demand-driven, which means that the business needs of the user dictate the technical solution, not the other way around. In other words, it should let the business users drive the process, and remove the problems of content relevance and software complexity.

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BI State of the Market Report


IT departments rarely know as much about a business as the business people themselves. But business people rarely take action on numbers alone: they share the information with others, soliciting their feedback and performing external research before taking action. Business users still depend on IT to deliver answers related to the information that they receive. Business intelligence (BI) 2.0—also known as collaborative BI—uses the collective intelligence of the user community to enrich existing information. Learn how business intelligence (BI) 2.0 is helping business users create and modify their own reports, share and enrich information, and provide feedback to each other and to information producers.

When the community helps itself, information is turned into actionable information more quickly than when using purely “traditional” methods of community support, such as meetings, phone calls, and e-mail. And when actions are taken more quickly, the entire organization becomes more nimble and ultimately more competitive. This overview discusses how BI 2.0 can provide real benefits within your organization and what product features to look for in a BI solution in order to realize those benefits.

We hope you’ll find this guide a useful tool in determining which BI solution is best suited to your company’s business model and particular needs.


Table of Contents


Executive Overview
Using BI 2.0 to Increase your Competitive Advantage

Case Study
LogiXML Helps to Power its Real-Estate Reporting and Analysis

Thought Leadership
How Smart Marketers Succeed Online

Market Insight
Mashups and Pervasive BI

Report Sponsors
LogiXML

IBM

About TEC



Download the full copy of the TEC 2009 BI Buyer’s Guide for businesses.



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Using BI 2.0 to Increase Your Competitive Advantage


Business users know their data better than IT does. They know the meaning of the data, its history, and its relationship with other data. Yet traditional BI solutions have business users referring to IT for assistance with their data. Also, they are forced to work in silos. Sure, they can create their own reports and maybe even share them with other business users, but when it comes to sharing their own knowledge about the data, they have to rely on e-mail, telephone, and face-to-face meetings. By enabling the sharing of data-related knowledge through the BI system itself, business users become more self-sufficient and actions can be taken more quickly.

The raison d’être of BI is to provide business users with information that enables them to take action. Even if business users are self-sufficient when it comes to creating and sharing data, data on its own is rarely sufficient to take action. Identifying an opportunity in the market through numbers alone is not sufficient to justify investment in a new product or geography. Identifying a bottleneck in a business process is not sufficient to justify changes in the business process. Information about a business issue or opportunity is merely a part of the overall “solution domain.” Action is usually only taken after considering a number of factors in addition to the data, such as human knowledge and experience, the economic environment, and the competitive environment.

In this section, we lay out the capabilities to look for in a BI solution—and specific functional requirements needed to support these capabilities—that contribute to the goal of “harnessing collective intelligence.” In general, the more recent entrants into the BI market are paying the most attention to BI 2.0. Some vendors, such as Good Data, have it as a central component of their solution offerings.

The following are key capabilities of BI 2.0:

  • Collaboration
    Business users are able to share information within the user community and create discussion threads relating to the information.


  • Identification of useful information
    Business users can flag information that is likely to be of use to others within the community.


  • Enriching of Information
    Business users can enrich the information through their knowledge and experience in addition to other external information sources in order to explain trends and generally assist other consumers of that information.


The community of “business users” needn’t be restricted to internal users. User collaboration is already mature within the Web space, under the guise of Web 2.0. With Web 2.0, collective intelligence is harnessed through comments on blog posts; contributions to wikis such as Wikipedia; and tagging of content, such as photos on Flickr. BI 2.0 takes these methods and applies them in the BI space by making data the focus of user collaboration.

The following sections take the capabilities above and list the functional requirements that support them. Bear in mind that each of these functional requirements is a business user requirement and not an IT or development requirement.


Download the full copy of the TEC 2009 BI Buyer’s Guide for businesses.

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Tentative Unification in Server I/O Architecture Battle


The Next Generation I/O (NGIO) and Future I/O groups have agreed to unify their efforts to develop the next I/O architecture.

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TEC 2013 Market Survey Report: What Organizations Want in Business Intelligence (BI) Software


This report gives an overview of current considerations for organizations seeking to purchase a business intelligence (BI) software solution. Based on aggregate data collected from more than 9,000 BI software comparisons performed using Technology Evaluation Centers’ (TEC’s) TEC Advisor software selection application during 2012, the report details what TEC data reveals about your peers' requirements for BI solutions, including functionalities, delivery models and access, customization and integration, server and database platforms, and budgeting.

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How Many Napkins Have to Die Needlessly? A Case for Business Architecture


Architecture is a description of how things go together. Once we know what our Business Architecture is, we can design an Information Technology Architecture to compliment it. Without a clearly stated architecture, there is a good chance that things will be put together wrong.

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When it comes to demand intelligence, which comes first? The right solution or the right architecture?


Hands down, it’s the right business intelligence (BI) architecture. If your enterprise currently uses retail demand data in a manner that favors either tier one (corporate users) or tier two members (retail sales team), then you don’t have the right architecture in place. And that means you don’t have the right demand intelligence (DI) solution. Read on to learn about what's important in a demand intelligence architecture strategy and how to choose the right DI architecture for your company.

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Engineering and Architecture


The engineering and architecture (also known as civil engineering) industry deals with the planning, design, and maintenance of physical structures including roads, bridges, buildings, and so on. As one of the oldest engineering disciplines, engineering and architecture has a very long history and keeps evolving based on the advancement of science and technology.

Facing economic and technological waves together with shifting market demands, today’s engineering and architecture firms need to address the following trends or challenges in order to be successful in their business practices.

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BI Hits the Road


Just when we thought that business intelligence (BI) systems were headed straight for the cloud, new BI applications are already being developed for another change in the way traditional BI tools used to work. Mobile technology is reaching every corner of organizational business process, from the ability to register and review transactions in an operational system, to the ability to

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