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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail
We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.
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 case studies for software upgrades


The Case for Integrated Processes
Most chief executive officers (CEOs) have developed strategies that push their companies to achieve certain goals. So why are so many companies failing to

case studies for software upgrades  : SAP (Wikipedia) The Case for Integrated Processes Integrated Processes is also known as : Integrated Processes , 2008 Integrated Report , Application Integrated , Assessment Processes , Automated Cost Estimating Integrated Tools , Best Practice Integrated , Engineering Processes , ERP Implementation Process , Framework for Integrated Testing , Framework Integrated Testing , Global Business Processes , Global Processes , Implementation Planning Process , Implementation Processes , Information System

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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail

We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.

Get free sample report
Compare Software Solutions

Visit the TEC store to compare leading software by functionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.

Compare Now

Process Manufacturing (ERP)

The simplified definition of enterprise resource planning (ERP) software is a set of applications that automate finance and human resources departments and help manufacturers handle jobs such as order processing and production scheduling. ERP began as a term used to describe a sophisticated and integrated software system used for manufacturing. In its simplest sense, ERP systems create interactive environments designed to help companies manage and analyze the business processes associated with manufacturing goods, such as inventory control, order taking, accounting, and much more. Although this basic definition still holds true for ERP systems, today its definition is expanding. Today's leading ERP systems group all traditional company management functions (finance, sales, manufacturing, human resources) and include, with varying degrees of acceptance and skill, many solutions that were formerly considered peripheral (product data management (PDM), warehouse management, manufacturing execution system (MES), reporting, etc.). While during the last few years the functional perimeter of ERP systems began an expansion into its adjacent markets, such as supply chain management (SCM), customer relationship management (CRM), business intelligence/data warehousing, and e-Business, the focus of this knowledge base is mainly on the traditional ERP realms of finance, materials planning, and human resources. The old adage is "Such a beginning, such an end", and, consequently, many ERP systems' failures could be traced back to a bad software selection. The foundation of any ERP implementation must be a proper exercise of aligning customers' IT technology with their business strategy, and subsequent software selection. This is the perfect time to create the business case and energize the entire organization towards the vision sharing and a buy in, both being the Key Success Factors (KSFs). Yet, these steps are very often neglected despite the amount of expert literature and articles that emphasize their importance.    

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Between Toyota and Sony: Japanese Software in the US Market


Asprova, Japanese developer of production scheduler/advanced planning and scheduling (APS) solutions, is eager to break into the US market. The company is curious, however, and perhaps a bit puzzled by the fact that there seems to be hesitation in the US market about buying Japanese-made software. Considering the popularity of Japanese-made consumer electronics and computer accessories, (in 2007

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SaaS Buyer's Guide for Wholesale and Distribution


SaaS, despite its phenomenal popularity, is certainly not one-size-fits-all. You need to consider decision criteria such as fit, return on investment, and risk. Learn how SaaS works, who the major vendors are, how SaaS can help your business grow, and how to find the SaaS solution that’s right for you. It’s all in this comprehensive SaaS Buyer’s Guide for Wholesale and Distribution from TEC and SupplyChainBrain.

From a business requirements perspective, the defining characteristic of wholesale and distribution (W&D) organizations is that they operate as intermediate agents between manufacturers and retailers. Their top business needs thus focus on requirements for:

  • processing high volumes of transactions,
  • maintaining constant communication between upstream and downstream collaborators (manufacturers and retailers/customers, respectively), and
  • managing products for multiple competitors within the same warehouse or distribution center

In this guide we will explore considerations for W&D organizations that are considering adoption of the SaaS delivery model, and examine the particular business issues that arise from this change.Specifically, we will address the following considerations:

  • the differences between SaaS and on-premise delivery models
  • SaaS architectures
  • SaaS pros, cons, and other considerations
  • selection criteria for SaaS-based applications
  • viable wholesale and distribution SaaS vendors

Later in this guide, we’ll provide examples of SaaS delivery model success stories, as well as a SaaS IT directory, segmented according to business area.


Table of Contents


Preface

Software as a Service: A Buyer’s Guide


Spotlight on Adaptability and Agility

Thought Leadership from SAP
SAP’s Perspective on Software as a Service

SAP Case Study
Johnson Products Capitalizing on New Sales after 30-day SAP Deployment


Spotlight on Manufacturing and Distribution

Thought Leadership from Epicor
SaaS ERP for Small Manufacturers and Distributors

TECSYS Case Study
LifeScience Logistics Achieves 99.97% Inventory Accuracy with TECYS’ EliteSeries for Healthcare


Spotlight on Growing Your Company with SaaS

Thought Leadership from NetSuite
The Benefits of a Business Management Software Suite for High-growth and Midsized Businesses: Overcoming the Barriers of Stand-alone Business Applications

NetSuite Case Study
Woodworking Machinery Maker Cuts Costs, Grows Efficiency with NetSuite

NetSuite Case Study
NetSuite Helps Manufacturer Take Advantage of Fast Market Growth


Spotlight on Distribution Centers

Thought Leadership from Bond International Software
Cloud Computing for Your Distribution Workforce

IBS Case Study
Konaflex Focuses on its Core Business with IBS Distribution Management Software


Vendor Directory


Download the full copy of the TEC 2010 SaaS Buyer’s Guide for wholesale and distribution.



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What Are the Differences between the SaaS and On-premise Delivery Models?



Defining the on-premise delivery model is relatively straightforward:

  • The software is acquired by the customer up-front.
  • The software is installed, deployed, managed, and maintained at the customer’s site, generally with a great degree of involvement by the customer.
  • The customer provides the in-house infrastructure (e.g., servers, hardware, networks) to support the software.


Defining the SaaS model is slightly more complex, since different SaaS vendors offer different definitions. We’ll explore these variations in more detail shortly, but for now we’ll note the following SaaS characteristics:

  • The software vendor provides customers with access to the software via the Internet.
  • The customer pays for this service on a subscription basis (normally per user, per month, or per number of transactions).
  • The vendor is responsible for maintenance, upgrades, and software support, as well as the supporting infrastructure.

The major difference between the on-premise and SaaS delivery model lies in the ownership of the software. In the on-premise model, once the software is purchased, the customer owns it. In the SaaS delivery model, the software is not owned by the customer: it is provided to the customer in the same manner as any other service.


Download the full copy of the TEC 2010 SaaS Buyer’s Guide for wholesale and distribution.

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5-step CRM Software Selection Guide: A Pragmatist’s Guide to CRM Software Selections


Selecting a new enterprise customer relationship management (CRM) solution is an undertaking that requires careful planning and managed execution. And in fact, there are a number of common mistakes that organizations make. Failing to execute the selection process in an objective and structured fashion can be an expensive financial mistake—as well as a fatal hit to your professional reputation.

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TEC 2015 ERP for Discrete Manufacturing Buyer's Guide


The TEC ERP for Discrete Manufacturing Buyer’s Guide was developed to provide unique perspectives on the state of the enterprise resource planning (ERP) solution market for manufacturers. Discrete manufacturers face a number of business challenges in the 21st century, including the traditional challenges of planning and managing production, managing costs, and staying compliant with regulations, and newer challenges related to the ability to support customizable and complex products and global markets, and hiring qualified staff.

How are manufacturers and vendors dealing with these changing requirements for manufacturing ERP? Read on to find out. In addition to a functionality comparison of manufacturing ERP products currently on the market, the TEC 2015 ERP for Discrete Manufacturing Buyer’s Guide includes the results of TEC’s ERP trends survey (showing some surprising trends and stats), a discussion about how ERP vendors are differentiating themselves these days with elements enhancing user experience, and a special section dedicated to configure, price, and quote (CPQ) solutions and their growing importance to discrete manufacturers. Case studies and thought leadership from leading vendors in the discrete manufacturing ERP software space are also included as examples of recent successful ERP implementations and upgrades.

Download the free guide now for TEC's expert analyst insight into manufacturing ERP trends, functionality comparisons, and vendor differentiation.

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TOWER Software


TOWER Software provides enterprise content management (ECM) solutions to government and regulated industries, as well as electronic document and records management (EDRM) solutions. TOWER Software is a privately held company with operations in North America, Europe, and Asia Pacific, and maintains strategic partnerships with technology and information management companies including Microsoft, Hewlett Packard, Adobe Systems, and Kofax. The vendor is headquartered in Canberra (Australia).

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A Business Intelligence Agenda for Midsize Organizations: Six Strategies for Success


Midsize companies see business intelligence (BI) as too unwieldy and expensive for them, and use spreadsheets for planning, budgeting, and forecasting. However, BI is well within reach through an incremental approach. Learn about six strategies for midsize companies for choosing and deploying BI solutions that address both business and IT challenges.

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Financial Forecasting: Room for Improvement for People, Process and Technology


Preparing an accurate forecast in this volatile business climate is challenging. Still, it is critical for businesses to be able to predict outcomes for the next month, quarter or year, and be able to respond quickly when the actuals vary significantly from the forecast. Forecasting may be equal parts art and science, but the most dialed-in enterprises report using a solid, collaborative process for generating accurate forecasts.

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WorkForce Software, Inc.


Located in Livonia, Michigan (US), WorkForce provides enterprise class, web-based time and attendance, and labor management software for large employers. It is a privately-held company.

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A Software-as-a-service Primer for Independent Software Vendors


Unlike many over-hyped technology trends of the past, software-as-a-service (SaaS) is producing real business benefits for organizations of all sizes across nearly every industry. This primer outlines how independent software vendors (ISVs) must respond to these realities in order to meet the changing needs of their customers, employees, and business partners; and ensure their long-term viability and competitiveness.

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TIBCO Software


TIBCO Software Inc. (NASDAQ: TIBX) is a provider of infrastructure and business intelligence  (BI) software. Whether it’s optimizing inventory, cross-selling products, or averting crisis before it happens, TIBCO uniquely delivers tthe ability to capture the right information at the right time and act on it preemptively for a competitive advantage. 

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