X
Software Functionality Revealed in Detail
We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.
Get free sample report

Compare Software Solutions
Visit the TEC store to compare leading software solutions by funtionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.
Compare Now
 

 characteristics of executive support system


Manufacturing 2007 Executive Summary
For a decade, IndustryWeek and the Manufacturing Performance Institute (MPI) Census of Manufacturers have provided data to US manufacturers. This year, MPI

characteristics of executive support system  Study (145 plants). Profile characteristics of all these facilities are summarized here: 74% of plants are part of a private company, 38% of plants are from the Midwest U.S. region, 72% of plants use discrete manufacturing operations, 71% of plants have been operating for more than 20 years, 59% of plants have corporate parents with less than $100 million in revenues, 20% of plants are machinery manufacturers, 21% of plants participate in an industrial equipment and machinery value chain, and 49% of plant

Read More


Software Functionality Revealed in Detail

We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.

Get free sample report
Compare Software Solutions

Visit the TEC store to compare leading software by functionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.

Compare Now

Document Management System (DMS)

Document management systems (DMS) assist with the management, creation, workflow, and storage of documents within different departments. A DMS stores documents in a database and associates important information about the documents, to the documents (known as metadata). Most systems provide workflow engines to design and support document creation, publication, and usage. DMS solutions are often used by insurance and health care industries, government bodies, or other organizations processing high volumes of documents. 

Start Now

Documents related to » characteristics of executive support system

The Definitive Guide to Successful Deployment of VoIP and IP Telephony-Chapter 3


When deploying any new system, preparation is key—and Internet protocol telephony (IPT) systems are no exception. Part 3 of this 4-part e-book series provides some basic steps you can take to successfully deploy voice and data network services. A complete capabilities inventory has been included to help you ensure that every feature of your current system will be considered for inclusion in your new system.

characteristics of executive support system   Read More

Fostering a Culture of Adaptability


Having the right IT infrastructure is critical to consistent growth and profitability for midsize companies. Sadly, many business applications don’t support changes to both business processes and a company’s organizational structure. In fact, many are inflexible and create disconnects between departments. However, there is a solution that’s built to enable growth and adaptability in all business functions and operations.

characteristics of executive support system   Read More

BI State of the Market Report


IT departments rarely know as much about a business as the business people themselves. But business people rarely take action on numbers alone: they share the information with others, soliciting their feedback and performing external research before taking action. Business users still depend on IT to deliver answers related to the information that they receive. Business intelligence (BI) 2.0—also known as collaborative BI—uses the collective intelligence of the user community to enrich existing information. Learn how business intelligence (BI) 2.0 is helping business users create and modify their own reports, share and enrich information, and provide feedback to each other and to information producers.

When the community helps itself, information is turned into actionable information more quickly than when using purely “traditional” methods of community support, such as meetings, phone calls, and e-mail. And when actions are taken more quickly, the entire organization becomes more nimble and ultimately more competitive. This overview discusses how BI 2.0 can provide real benefits within your organization and what product features to look for in a BI solution in order to realize those benefits.

We hope you’ll find this guide a useful tool in determining which BI solution is best suited to your company’s business model and particular needs.


Table of Contents


Executive Overview
Using BI 2.0 to Increase your Competitive Advantage

Case Study
LogiXML Helps to Power its Real-Estate Reporting and Analysis

Thought Leadership
How Smart Marketers Succeed Online

Market Insight
Mashups and Pervasive BI

Report Sponsors
LogiXML

IBM

About TEC



Download the full copy of the TEC 2009 BI Buyer’s Guide for businesses.



Report Preview


Using BI 2.0 to Increase Your Competitive Advantage


Business users know their data better than IT does. They know the meaning of the data, its history, and its relationship with other data. Yet traditional BI solutions have business users referring to IT for assistance with their data. Also, they are forced to work in silos. Sure, they can create their own reports and maybe even share them with other business users, but when it comes to sharing their own knowledge about the data, they have to rely on e-mail, telephone, and face-to-face meetings. By enabling the sharing of data-related knowledge through the BI system itself, business users become more self-sufficient and actions can be taken more quickly.

The raison d’être of BI is to provide business users with information that enables them to take action. Even if business users are self-sufficient when it comes to creating and sharing data, data on its own is rarely sufficient to take action. Identifying an opportunity in the market through numbers alone is not sufficient to justify investment in a new product or geography. Identifying a bottleneck in a business process is not sufficient to justify changes in the business process. Information about a business issue or opportunity is merely a part of the overall “solution domain.” Action is usually only taken after considering a number of factors in addition to the data, such as human knowledge and experience, the economic environment, and the competitive environment.

In this section, we lay out the capabilities to look for in a BI solution—and specific functional requirements needed to support these capabilities—that contribute to the goal of “harnessing collective intelligence.” In general, the more recent entrants into the BI market are paying the most attention to BI 2.0. Some vendors, such as Good Data, have it as a central component of their solution offerings.

The following are key capabilities of BI 2.0:

  • Collaboration
    Business users are able to share information within the user community and create discussion threads relating to the information.


  • Identification of useful information
    Business users can flag information that is likely to be of use to others within the community.


  • Enriching of Information
    Business users can enrich the information through their knowledge and experience in addition to other external information sources in order to explain trends and generally assist other consumers of that information.


The community of “business users” needn’t be restricted to internal users. User collaboration is already mature within the Web space, under the guise of Web 2.0. With Web 2.0, collective intelligence is harnessed through comments on blog posts; contributions to wikis such as Wikipedia; and tagging of content, such as photos on Flickr. BI 2.0 takes these methods and applies them in the BI space by making data the focus of user collaboration.

The following sections take the capabilities above and list the functional requirements that support them. Bear in mind that each of these functional requirements is a business user requirement and not an IT or development requirement.


Download the full copy of the TEC 2009 BI Buyer’s Guide for businesses.

characteristics of executive support system   Read More

Measuring the Business Value of IT


Many organizations do a poor job of measuring the business value of their IT investments. Simple financial metrics are not good enough. But there are a number of consistent, repeatable, and credible measurement methodologies that hold both business users and IT departments accountable. Compare four methodologies, and learn how adding one of them to your overall governance framework can improve your IT investment returns.

characteristics of executive support system   Read More

Decision Support Systems -- Overview and Case Studies


Decison support systems range from simple electronic filing cabinets to complex data intensive and analytically sophisticated executive information systems. This primer provides an overview with real case studies.

characteristics of executive support system   Read More

OutStart TrainingEdge.com Learning Management System Certification Report


The OutStart product TrainingEdge.com is now TEC Certified for online evaluation of learning management systems in the Human Capital Management (HCM) Evaluation Center. The certification seal is a valuable indicator for organizations relying on the integrity of TEC research for assistance with their software selection projects. Download this report for product highlights, competitive analysis, product analysis, and in-depth analyst commentary.

characteristics of executive support system   Read More

ITIL Service Support Processes in Record Time


To establish optimal service and support conditions, the case company, Naviair, chose to adapt and implement information technology infrastructure library (ITIL) service support processes. During the process, Implement Consulting Group assisted with facilitation, ITIL input, and lean competences and tools. The existing procedures and instructions were combined with ITIL’s different service support areas.

characteristics of executive support system   Read More

Top 8 Questions to Ask Your Phone System Vendor


To help you out, here are the eight crucial questions to ask when evaluating and negotiating a phone system deal.

characteristics of executive support system   Read More

Analysis of TeleCommunication Systems, Inc. Release of Menu Driven Wireless Web Capability For SMS


The advent of menu driven wireless web capabilities for SMS (Short Message Service) will allow carriers to offer their subscribers fully personalized web based menus for quick access to stock quotes and bi-directional transactions such as e-business or gaming.

characteristics of executive support system   Read More

Matching the Correct Phone System to Your Business


Are you spending more time than you anticipated shopping for a new business phone system? This comprehensive listing reviews leading phone systems on the market for small-size businesses; medium-size businesses (includes both on-premises and hosted solutions); and enterprise-level businesses. This guide will help streamline your search for a new phone system, so you focus on those systems that are appropriate for your needs.

characteristics of executive support system   Read More