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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail
We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.
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Compare Software Solutions
Visit the TEC store to compare leading software solutions by funtionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.
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 comparison of reporting tools


E-learning Benefits and ROI Comparison of E-learning versus Traditional Training
You’re considering a move from traditional training to e-learning, but you’re not sure if the returns will be significant. In fact, employees are better able to

comparison of reporting tools  learning Benefits and ROI Comparison of E-learning versus Traditional Training E-Learning Benefits and ROI Comparison of E-Learning vs. Traditional Training If you receive errors when attempting to view this white paper, please install the latest version of Adobe Reader. Since 1995, SyberWorks has been providing organizations with a unique and economical solution to develop, deliver, manage, measure, and improve their e-Learning activities. Source : SyberWorks Resources Related to E-Learning

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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail

We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.

Get free sample report
Compare Software Solutions

Visit the TEC store to compare leading software by functionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.

Compare Now

Learning Management Suite (LMS)

These are tools for managing, creating, scheduling training or learning in your organization. The terminology varies from vendor to vendor. Learning management systems (LMS) typically help to manage both classroom and on-line learning. They do not normally include content creation or management tools but may in some cases. Some LMSs may manage just classroom or just e-learning rather than both. Some LMSs may also include content authoring and managment and virtual classrooms. Learning content management systems (LCMS) emphasize the management of content for courses/training/learning. In most cases, they include content authoring tools. In some cases, they may also include some of the features of LMSs. Content authoring tools are often provided as part of an LCMS. They may also be stand-alone products. Virtual classrooms (web conferencing tools) normally are separate third party offerings but may be included as part of a suite of tools. Suites of tools include features of at least two or more of the above categories. While some companies offer just LMS or LCMS systems others offer suites of products, which provide all or most of the features of the other tools. Suites combine several capabilities of learning management--usually two or more of the following: learning management, classroom training management, e-learning management, custom content creation, learning content management, learning object repositories, or virtual classrooms.  

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Precision Marketing: Strengthening the Value of CRM


All organizations, across all industries, have one thing in common—a deluge of customer data idling somewhere waiting to be monetized. Most likely, the similarities end there. The accuracy, depth, and accessibility of data are as varied as the products and services offered by organizations. The use of this data is what separates successful organizations from those who go bankrupt.

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State of the Market: HR


Despite predictions that it would be subsumed by enterprise resource planning (ERP) vendors encroaching from above and automation vendors encroaching from below, the manufacturing execution systems (MES) market has been growing steadily. This guide from TEC and Flexware Innovation provides state-of-the-market analysis, success stories from your peers, in-depth information on solutions, and a spotlight on leading vendors.

The products covered in this guide address the management of a company’s workforce, including hiring, payroll, benefits, training, health and safety, and more.

While HRIS are also commonly referred to as human resource management systems (HRMS) or as human capital management (HCM), for the purpose of this guide, we will refer to the systems that support HR functionality as HRIS throughout. All these systems—in one way or another—encompass core HR functionality.

We’ve included customer success stories to illustrate how the various HR solutions have helped companies like yours solve personnel, payroll, and benefit management problems.

For your convenience, there is also a vendor directory to assist companies looking for an HRIS, whether it’s an end-to-end on-premise solution, an on-demand or software-as-a-service (SaaS) solution, a third party solution, or a best-of-breed solution.

We hope you’ll find this guide a useful tool in determining which HRIS is best suited to your company’s business model and particular needs.


Table of Contents


Introduction

State of the Midsize HR Marketplace

Executive Summary: Core HR

Thou Shalt Manage Human Capital Better

Customer Success Story: Core HR

Nikon Reaps Benefits from Ultimate Software’s Ultipro

Executive Summary: Human Capital Management

Tactical Human Resources Evolves into Strategic Human Capital Management

Customer Success Story: Talent Management

Commerce Bank is Counting on Lawson

Vendor Spotlight

Auxillium West

Ceridian Canada Limited

CheckPoint HR

Lawson

NuView Systems, Inc.

Sage Software

Ultimate Software

Unicorn HRO


Download the full copy of the TEC 2008 HR Buyer’s Guide for SMBs.



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State of the HR Marketplace


For many years, HR management has been viewed as the enterprise function responsible for staffing and personnel-related issues, such as recruiting and hiring, establishing employment policies, handling pay and retirement plans, and administering benefits. Today, company executives see the HR function in an entirely different way. From recruiting, hiring, and training new staff, to the transfer of key functions from the back office to the front line, it is evident that executives are looking to transform HR from a seemingly low-priority function into a strategic and vital part of the business.

What is fueling this transformation is that SMB executives are beginning to understand the critical link between their people and the bottom line. To remain competitive as an SMB in today’s job market, employers need to know what their employees are doing, what skills they have, their ambitions, how they are progressing, and how they fit into the future of the business.

SMBs that continue to view HR as strictly a department or administrative service and that fail to infuse HR functions throughout the organization will inevitably limit their ability to compete and grow.

We’ll review some of the trends in the HR space, as well as some of the challenges facing SMBs in the wake of globalization and the changing HR landscape.


Download the full copy of the TEC 2008 HR buyers guide for SMBs.

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BI Capabilities Comparison: Sage MAS 90 ERP Vs QuickBooks Enterprise


Get the white paper that compares the business intelligence capabilities of these two popular business management solutions head-to-head.

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BI State of the Market Report


IT departments rarely know as much about a business as the business people themselves. But business people rarely take action on numbers alone: they share the information with others, soliciting their feedback and performing external research before taking action. Business users still depend on IT to deliver answers related to the information that they receive. Business intelligence (BI) 2.0—also known as collaborative BI—uses the collective intelligence of the user community to enrich existing information. Learn how business intelligence (BI) 2.0 is helping business users create and modify their own reports, share and enrich information, and provide feedback to each other and to information producers.

When the community helps itself, information is turned into actionable information more quickly than when using purely “traditional” methods of community support, such as meetings, phone calls, and e-mail. And when actions are taken more quickly, the entire organization becomes more nimble and ultimately more competitive. This overview discusses how BI 2.0 can provide real benefits within your organization and what product features to look for in a BI solution in order to realize those benefits.

We hope you’ll find this guide a useful tool in determining which BI solution is best suited to your company’s business model and particular needs.


Table of Contents


Executive Overview
Using BI 2.0 to Increase your Competitive Advantage

Case Study
LogiXML Helps to Power its Real-Estate Reporting and Analysis

Thought Leadership
How Smart Marketers Succeed Online

Market Insight
Mashups and Pervasive BI

Report Sponsors
LogiXML

IBM

About TEC



Download the full copy of the TEC 2009 BI Buyer’s Guide for businesses.



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Using BI 2.0 to Increase Your Competitive Advantage


Business users know their data better than IT does. They know the meaning of the data, its history, and its relationship with other data. Yet traditional BI solutions have business users referring to IT for assistance with their data. Also, they are forced to work in silos. Sure, they can create their own reports and maybe even share them with other business users, but when it comes to sharing their own knowledge about the data, they have to rely on e-mail, telephone, and face-to-face meetings. By enabling the sharing of data-related knowledge through the BI system itself, business users become more self-sufficient and actions can be taken more quickly.

The raison d’être of BI is to provide business users with information that enables them to take action. Even if business users are self-sufficient when it comes to creating and sharing data, data on its own is rarely sufficient to take action. Identifying an opportunity in the market through numbers alone is not sufficient to justify investment in a new product or geography. Identifying a bottleneck in a business process is not sufficient to justify changes in the business process. Information about a business issue or opportunity is merely a part of the overall “solution domain.” Action is usually only taken after considering a number of factors in addition to the data, such as human knowledge and experience, the economic environment, and the competitive environment.

In this section, we lay out the capabilities to look for in a BI solution—and specific functional requirements needed to support these capabilities—that contribute to the goal of “harnessing collective intelligence.” In general, the more recent entrants into the BI market are paying the most attention to BI 2.0. Some vendors, such as Good Data, have it as a central component of their solution offerings.

The following are key capabilities of BI 2.0:

  • Collaboration
    Business users are able to share information within the user community and create discussion threads relating to the information.


  • Identification of useful information
    Business users can flag information that is likely to be of use to others within the community.


  • Enriching of Information
    Business users can enrich the information through their knowledge and experience in addition to other external information sources in order to explain trends and generally assist other consumers of that information.


The community of “business users” needn’t be restricted to internal users. User collaboration is already mature within the Web space, under the guise of Web 2.0. With Web 2.0, collective intelligence is harnessed through comments on blog posts; contributions to wikis such as Wikipedia; and tagging of content, such as photos on Flickr. BI 2.0 takes these methods and applies them in the BI space by making data the focus of user collaboration.

The following sections take the capabilities above and list the functional requirements that support them. Bear in mind that each of these functional requirements is a business user requirement and not an IT or development requirement.


Download the full copy of the TEC 2009 BI Buyer’s Guide for businesses.

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Technology Evaluation Centers Mourns Loss of Chairman, Marcel Côté


It was with great sadness that TEC learned of the death of Marcel Côté, chairman of TEC’s board of directors.

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Busting Out of the Inbox: Five New Rules of 1to1® E-mail Marketing


Situating e-mail in a multichannel marketing plan is more complicated than it used to be. Where exactly does e-mail fit in the world of blogs, vlogs, and podcasts—where MSN, Google, and Yahoo! call the shots? Marketers need to understand which strategies and tactics are most effective to ensure that their e-mails will be delivered, opened, and acted upon.

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Reporting for Midsize Companies


Reporting is a valuable tool that can help you understand your company’s performance. The right reporting tool is simply the one that lets you work with information the way you want to, and gives you confidence that the information is relevant and accurate. Find out how a single reporting application can reduce the complexity of the reporting environment for IT, while delivering more benefits for your users.

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Enterprise Intelligence Tools Tame Business Knowledge Glut


Skila, Inc. is applying advanced eKnowedge tools to the pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and medical device industries. It’s the kind of offering every knowledge worker wants to have.

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Soaring across the Regions: A View of the Impact of the Internet on Business


The Internet offers companies the opportunity to present a commercial image independent of size and location. With this and the Internet’s ability to extend a business’s reach, it is valuable to know precisely what various Internet service providers (ISPs) offer before buying. This includes evaluating service level and support capabilities and understanding how these vary throughout the United Kingdom (UK). Find out more.

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Beware of Vendors Bearing Solutions


Hype has been a major factor in the recent downfall of some of the enterprise application industry's most illustrious players. This article presents some very simple things that you can do to prevent yourself and your company from being tomorrow's lead story in the industry trades.

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