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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail
We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.
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 crm for enterprises


The Business Need for CRM for Large and Medium Sized Enterprises
The software for business market developed in response to large organizations’ need to manage their assets and main activities. Be it customer relationship

crm for enterprises  Business Need for CRM for Large and Medium Sized Enterprises The software for business market developed in response to large organizations’ need to manage their assets and main activities. Be it customer relationship management (CRM), human capital management (HCM), or enterprise resource planning (ERP), initially only large enterprises were able to commission and acquire such products. But as with anything else that grows successfully in our global economy, software for business quickly became a

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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail

We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.

Get free sample report
Compare Software Solutions

Visit the TEC store to compare leading software by functionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.

Compare Now

CRM for Financial and Insurance Markets

Customer relationship management (CRM) focuses on the retention of customers by collecting data from all customer interactions with a company from all access points (by phone, mail, or Web, or in the field). The company can then use this data for specific business purposes by taking a customer-centric rather than a product-centric approach. CRM applications are front-end tools designed to facilitate the capture, consolidation, analysis, and enterprise-wide dissemination of data from existing and potential customers. This process occurs throughout the marketing, sales, and service stages, with the objective of better understanding one’s customers and anticipating their interest in an enterprise’s products or services.  

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Documents related to » crm for enterprises

Announcing the 2013 TEC CRM Buyer’s Guide for Medium and Large Enterprises


We are pleased to announce the launch of TEC’s first buyer’s guide of 2013: CRM for Medium and Large Enterprises. Download your free PDF copy now. This buyer’s guide provides in-depth insight from TEC CRM analyst Raluca Druta on a how a comprehensive customer relationship management (CRM) system can help medium and large enterprises better understand and address their customers’ needs and

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TEC 2013 CRM Buyer's Guide for Medium and Large Enterprises


Great customer service is the best (some say the only) way to truly stand out from the competition. CRM vendors are helping companies rise to the challenge with new tools for building and measuring relationships. In the 2013 TEC CRM Buyer’s Guide, analyst Raluca Druta walks you through the latest CRM developments and looks at how trends like customer experience management, mobility, and social media integration are changing the way companies do business.

Customer relationship management (CRM) solutions for medium and large enterprises need to be able to accommodate large numbers of complex CRM demands. Medium- and largesized companies often operate across several countries and/or continents and therefore need to harmonize their customers’ efforts and opinions across their respective cultures and geographies. In response to this reality, medium and large enterprises require cohesive systems that allow for coherent customer relationship management.

A cohesive CRM system ensures that there are no repetitions and inadequacies in interactions with customers. A thorough understanding of how the customer moves through the company’s offerings and services is also essential. If the customer experience is grasped correctly, insight can be gained into how internal employees and external partners have responded to customers and the level of satisfaction that the customer has derived from those interactions.

Here is a look at how a cohesive CRM system should work from the perspective of all three points of contact comprised by a CRM system (i.e., sales, marketing, and customer support).

For the purposes of this buyer’s guide, medium and large enterprises are defined as those organizations that have more than 500 employees and more than $100 million (USD) in annual revenue.


Table of Contents


Preface

The Business Need for CRM

The Features and Functions of CRM for Enterprises

CRM Vendors’ Approach to Addressing Customer-related Challenges

Conclusion

Vendor Solutions


TEC Resources for CRM for Medium and Large Enterprises

TEC Selection Project: ”Antiquated” CRM System Lags behind Mobile Salesforce


Casebook

KANA Thought Leadership: Building a Profitable Multi-channel Customer Service Experience

Mydex Thought Leadership: A New Personal Information Management Ecosystem

NetSuite Thought Leadership: Several Key Functional Criteria for Evaluating CRM Applications

ANALEC Customer Success Story: ANALEC ClientManager Empowers a Global Investment Bank’s Brokerage Business to Proactively Manage Its Customer Needs and Intelligently Allocate Resources to Boost Profitability

Avidian Technologies Customer Success Story: Elobau Increases Productivity with CRM Software from Avidian Technologies

BPMonline Customer Success Story: Multinational Software Company Uses BPMonline to Optimize and Control Processes

Microsoft Dynamics CRM and Ignify Customer Success Story: Global Electronic Systems Company Uses Microsoft Dynamics CRM to Manage Sales and Customer Service Operations

KANA Customer Success Story: Telkomsel: Breaking Down Barriers with Exceptional Customer Service

NetSuite Customer Success Story: Prudential Locations Enjoys Skyrocketing Agent Productivity with NetSuite CRM+

Salesforce Customer Success Story: First Data Selects Salesforce to Improve Lead Management

SAP Customer Success Story: Customer Intimacy and Lower Costs Go Hand-in-Hand at Yaskawa

SAP Customer Success Story: Nebraska Book Company: Starting a New Chapter in Its Business with SAP® Sales OnDemand

UBA Service Center for Sage CRM Customer Success Story: UBA Service Center for Sage CRM Gives KIA Dealers in Jordan and Iraq a 360-Degree View of Sales, Service Center, and Back-office Integration

Yunano Customer Success Story: Shenzhen Artron Color Printing Co., Ltd. Selects Yonyou CRM System


TEC Partners Resources Directory

Vendor Directory


Download the full copy of the TEC 2013 CRM Buyer’s Guide for Medium and Large Enterprises.



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The Features and Functions of CRM for Enterprises


Product Technology: Integration

As the business needs for medium and large enterprises set these organizations apart from others, vendors propose CRM software solutions for enterprises that address these particular needs. In this section we will look at CRM for enterprises from two points of view: product technology and functionality.

Most vendors of CRM solutions for enterprises tend to offer complex functionality within a single solution or through integration with other solutions developed by the same vendor or its partners. Nevertheless, with the explosion of CRM niche solutions, medium and large enterprises might be tempted to buy several software solutions from different vendors to manage their CRM requirements. While sometimes they don’t have a choice, this can cause several potential integration problems.

The first set of problems that can be encountered is at the database level. Conflicts might appear between different types of databases (Oracle vs. Microsoft SQL, for example). Even if in theory this does not look like a big problem, in the day-to-day reality integration between two databases can become a nightmare. As the database structure differs from one provider to another, mapping is needed. This can be achieved either with internal IT staff or by buying services from vendors—both imply extra costs. It is preferable for enterprises to buy solutions from the same vendor. Even if these solutions are not perfectly integrated, at least they offer application program interfaces (APIs) and connectors that have been preconfigured to integrate between solutions.

Second, some niche solutions are offered on premise while others are offered in the cloud. Data residing in the cloud is not typically administered by the end user and thus cannot be accessed anytime, anywhere to perform stored procedures (a subroutine available to connected relational database system applications). End users usually require special permission from the vendor to perform any action on data stored in the cloud. In addition, upgrades of either on-premise or cloud solutions can lead to conflicts or rules being overridden. For instance, the API might fail to function as expected after an upgrade. Or permission to access certain functionality or data might be changed.


Download the full copy of the TEC 2013 CRM Buyer’s Guide for Medium and Large Enterprises.

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CRM in Not-for-profit Organizations


Traditionally, customer relationship management (CRM) solutions have been seen as tools for commercial enterprises, aiming to increase sales and ultimately profit. Although the functionality in CRM packages undoubtedly supports the commercial activities of business, it is worth exploring how the same features can be used to equally good effect in a not-for-profit (NFP) or charity environment. Find out more.

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Strategies for a Successful CRM Implementation: A Guide for Small and Medium Sized Enterprises


In general, most organizations agree that customer satisfaction—one measure of customer relationship management (CRM) success—improves when CRM software is implemented. This white paper discusses the keys to successfully implementing CRM software solutions, as well as some of the important prerequisites—people and processes—to finding and installing CRM technology.

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IFS Applications (v. 7.5) for ERP for Engineer-to-Order (ETO) Manufacturing Certification Report


IFS Applications (v. 7.5) is TEC Certified for online evaluation of enterprise resource planning (ERP) for engineer-to-order (ETO) manufacturing solutions in the ERP Evaluation Center. The certification seal is a valuable indicator for organizations relying on the integrity of TEC research for assistance with their software selection projects. Download this report for product highlights, competitive analysis, product analysis, and in-depth analyst commentary.

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An Opportunity for Change: 10 Recommendations for Advancing Your HR Technology Strategy


This report outlines 10 recommendations for companies to advance its human resources (HR) technology strategy. From conducting a global systems inventory and redeploying software to recalibrating talent strategies and targeting critical roles to focusing on end-user experience and tapping social collaboration, it offers easy-to-implement recommendations to help organizations d position themselves for long-term success.

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Advanced project for Microsoft Dynamics AX: ERP for Services (Non-manufacturing) Competitor Analysis Report


The enterprise resource planning (ERP) for services knowledge base is appropriate for organizations in service-oriented industries. It consists of enterprise-wide integrated information systems that manage the operations, services, and resources of non-manufacturing organizations.

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A Business Intelligence Agenda for Midsize Organizations: Six Strategies for Success


Midsize companies see business intelligence (BI) as too unwieldy and expensive for them, and use spreadsheets for planning, budgeting, and forecasting. However, BI is well within reach through an incremental approach. Learn about six strategies for midsize companies for choosing and deploying BI solutions that address both business and IT challenges.

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Transition for Manhattan Associates Necessary for Long Term Growth


Based in Atlanta, Georgia, $78 million Manhattan Associates, Inc. develops, markets, and supports supply chain execution systems for distribution center management and Internet fulfillment. 1999 was a difficult year for the vendor, marked by reorganization and management turnover in the midst of rapid corporate expansion. Completing its transition to an Internet enabler will be important for Manhattan's long term future.

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Maximizer CRM: Customer Relationship Management (CRM) Competitor Analysis Report


This comprehensive, customer relationship management (CRM) knowledge base covers the full range of CRM functionality. Modeled especially to help clients requiring modern B2B or B2C solutions, it covers marketing automation, sales force automation, customer service and support, partner management, contract management and creation, project and team management, Internet sales, e-mail response management, analytics, and important technical criteria.

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