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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail
We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.
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 db2 losing market


The Lexicon of CRM - Part 3: From R to Z
CRM. C.R.M. itself is an acronym, standing for Customer Relationship Management. This is part three of a three-part article to provide explanation and meaning

db2 losing market  SQLServer 2000, and IBM's DB2 and Informix. RFI - Request For Information . A formal document sent by a customer to a vendor asking for specific information about their product or line of products. It's usually the first salvo in several rounds of information gathering by customers in the vendor selection process. RFQ - Request For Quote . A formal document sent by a customer to a vendor asking them to put together a product and service package, with prices, for the customer to consider accepting and

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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail

We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.

Get free sample report
Compare Software Solutions

Visit the TEC store to compare leading software by functionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.

Compare Now

Enterprise Marketing Management (EMM)

The Enterprise Marketing Management (EMM) Knowledge Base research helps determine support levels of various systems that help companies market their services or products effectively and efficiently. EMM tools help manage strategic planning and marketing resources (sometimes referred to as marketing resource management or MRM). This KB also covers rule-based techniques, pattern recognition, and other profiling features.  

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Nortel and Clarify: Was There Ever Synergy Enough to Support this Marriage?


Back in 1999, when Nortel was on a buying spree and reeling in record profits, it plunked down US$2.1 billion dollars for Clarify Inc., a leader in the CRM space that was bringing in $250 million in revenues annually. Now, in July of 2001, with Nortel expecting losses in the order of US$19.2 billion, Clarify may be jettisoned at a significant loss.

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SSA GT to EXE-cute (Yet) Another Acquisition Part Two: EXE


Like the previous few SSA GT acquisitions, this merger too seems aimed at enlarging SSA GT's customer base, market share, and more importantly, its predictably recurring support revenue and consequently larger R&D pool. Both companies have notable customer bases with a wide geographic spread (particularly in emerging markets that have been much less affected by the recession).

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Oracle Applications - An Internet-Reinvented Feisty Challenger


It is startling how much has changed in Oracle’s applications business during the last two years. Oracle is indisputably the most reformed applications vendor, having achieved significant growth in total revenue, license revenue and net income. Oracle has a head start on most of its competition pertaining to Internet applications, and the Company still leads the ERP pack both on product technology vision and execution. However, the future will by no means be without serious challenges.

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RedPrairie Makes a Smart Turn into SaaS WMS


My attendance of RedPrairie Corporations’ RedShift 2010 user conference (for the first time ever) confirmed what I have long sensed about the company’s corporate culture and its install base. That is, the previous blog series on a few supply chain management (SCM) players has, inter alia, expressed my opinions about RedPrairie (formerly McHugh Software), and I believed that

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BI State of the Market Report


IT departments rarely know as much about a business as the business people themselves. But business people rarely take action on numbers alone: they share the information with others, soliciting their feedback and performing external research before taking action. Business users still depend on IT to deliver answers related to the information that they receive. Business intelligence (BI) 2.0—also known as collaborative BI—uses the collective intelligence of the user community to enrich existing information. Learn how business intelligence (BI) 2.0 is helping business users create and modify their own reports, share and enrich information, and provide feedback to each other and to information producers.

When the community helps itself, information is turned into actionable information more quickly than when using purely “traditional” methods of community support, such as meetings, phone calls, and e-mail. And when actions are taken more quickly, the entire organization becomes more nimble and ultimately more competitive. This overview discusses how BI 2.0 can provide real benefits within your organization and what product features to look for in a BI solution in order to realize those benefits.

We hope you’ll find this guide a useful tool in determining which BI solution is best suited to your company’s business model and particular needs.


Table of Contents


Executive Overview
Using BI 2.0 to Increase your Competitive Advantage

Case Study
LogiXML Helps to Power its Real-Estate Reporting and Analysis

Thought Leadership
How Smart Marketers Succeed Online

Market Insight
Mashups and Pervasive BI

Report Sponsors
LogiXML

IBM

About TEC



Download the full copy of the TEC 2009 BI Buyer’s Guide for businesses.



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Using BI 2.0 to Increase Your Competitive Advantage


Business users know their data better than IT does. They know the meaning of the data, its history, and its relationship with other data. Yet traditional BI solutions have business users referring to IT for assistance with their data. Also, they are forced to work in silos. Sure, they can create their own reports and maybe even share them with other business users, but when it comes to sharing their own knowledge about the data, they have to rely on e-mail, telephone, and face-to-face meetings. By enabling the sharing of data-related knowledge through the BI system itself, business users become more self-sufficient and actions can be taken more quickly.

The raison d’être of BI is to provide business users with information that enables them to take action. Even if business users are self-sufficient when it comes to creating and sharing data, data on its own is rarely sufficient to take action. Identifying an opportunity in the market through numbers alone is not sufficient to justify investment in a new product or geography. Identifying a bottleneck in a business process is not sufficient to justify changes in the business process. Information about a business issue or opportunity is merely a part of the overall “solution domain.” Action is usually only taken after considering a number of factors in addition to the data, such as human knowledge and experience, the economic environment, and the competitive environment.

In this section, we lay out the capabilities to look for in a BI solution—and specific functional requirements needed to support these capabilities—that contribute to the goal of “harnessing collective intelligence.” In general, the more recent entrants into the BI market are paying the most attention to BI 2.0. Some vendors, such as Good Data, have it as a central component of their solution offerings.

The following are key capabilities of BI 2.0:

  • Collaboration
    Business users are able to share information within the user community and create discussion threads relating to the information.


  • Identification of useful information
    Business users can flag information that is likely to be of use to others within the community.


  • Enriching of Information
    Business users can enrich the information through their knowledge and experience in addition to other external information sources in order to explain trends and generally assist other consumers of that information.


The community of “business users” needn’t be restricted to internal users. User collaboration is already mature within the Web space, under the guise of Web 2.0. With Web 2.0, collective intelligence is harnessed through comments on blog posts; contributions to wikis such as Wikipedia; and tagging of content, such as photos on Flickr. BI 2.0 takes these methods and applies them in the BI space by making data the focus of user collaboration.

The following sections take the capabilities above and list the functional requirements that support them. Bear in mind that each of these functional requirements is a business user requirement and not an IT or development requirement.


Download the full copy of the TEC 2009 BI Buyer’s Guide for businesses.

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Enterprise Incentive Management Leader Responds to Market Demands


The market for enterprise incentive management (EIM) products is in its early stages and is rapidly evolving. Callidus Software is the EIM vendor of choice for some of the largest companies in the world.

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Market Impact of Lawson-Intentia Merger


The Lawson and Intentia merger might create a much-needed, strong statement for the market, and provide the mid-market with more options. It may also decrease the negative momentum both companies have experienced in the frenzied and rapidly consolidating enterprise applications market.

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Baan And SSA GT Merge To Form A Mid-Market Empire With An ''Iron Side'' Part Three: Market Impact On SSA GT


Like the previous few SSA GT's acquisitions, this merger too seems aimed at enlarging combined Baan and SSA GT's customer base, market share, and, more importantly, its predictably recurring support revenue and consequently larger R&D pool.

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Has Consolidation Made the PLM Market More Agile?


While the race for the pole position in the still evolving, moving-target PLM market started several years ago, it has been quite accelerated by Agile Software's fourth acquisition in 2003. Particularly with the most recent Agile-Eigner announcement, the two players have apparently decided to leapfrog many direct competitors by joining complementary forces.

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Examples Of How Some Mid-Market Vendors Might Remain Within The Future Three (Dozen)? Part Two: Agilisys Market Impact


The most recent merger looks initially like a positive move for both companies and their customers, since Agilisys further enlarges a foothold in the discrete automotive manufacturing (which it has recently started with BRAIN) and solid SCE product modules that it might embed into its own SCM suite and possibly cross-sell into many industries (yet to be scrutinized, though).

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