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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail
We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.
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 example of non action


The High Costs of Non-compliance for Manufacturers
What manufacturers must realize is that through efforts to comply with regulatory standards, they can make their manufacturing operations more competitive

example of non action  in this area. An example of this is HP's strategies for recycling the tens of millions of CRTs being retired from use throughout Europe. HP has been asked to desegregate the most toxic components of their CRTs and recycle the less-harmful elements. They've been able to accomplish this using the processes put in place from DfE initiatives over 10 years ago. There are many other examples of manufacturers gaining competitive advantage through compliance, and the one take-away all of these companies share is

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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail

We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.

Get free sample report
Compare Software Solutions

Visit the TEC store to compare leading software by functionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.

Compare Now

ERP for Services (Non-manufacturing) Software Evaluation Report

The enterprise resource planning (ERP) for services Software Evaluation Report is appropriate for organizations in service-oriented industries. It consists of enterprise-wide integrated information systems that manage the operations, services, and resources of non-manufacturing organizations. 

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Measuring the Business Value of IT


Many organizations do a poor job of measuring the business value of their IT investments. Simple financial metrics are not good enough. But there are a number of consistent, repeatable, and credible measurement methodologies that hold both business users and IT departments accountable. Compare four methodologies, and learn how adding one of them to your overall governance framework can improve your IT investment returns.

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Point of Sale: To Stand Alone or Not?


When selecting a point of sale (POS) solution, users have a choice between stand-alone solutions and integrated solutions. They should first evaluate core and non-core components of POS systems, and assess the strengths and weaknesses of best-of-breed and integrated approaches.

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The Next R(E)volution of Lean


By seeing a business as a "value system" for customers, companies can shift lean strategic priorities towards growth-oriented targets instead of cost-cutting. Instead of squeezing additional margins to boost the bottom line, lean philosophy can increase demand response and sales, while maintaining and lowering cost per unit—thus enabling lower prices, a competitive edge, and more business.

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BI State of the Market Report


IT departments rarely know as much about a business as the business people themselves. But business people rarely take action on numbers alone: they share the information with others, soliciting their feedback and performing external research before taking action. Business users still depend on IT to deliver answers related to the information that they receive. Business intelligence (BI) 2.0—also known as collaborative BI—uses the collective intelligence of the user community to enrich existing information. Learn how business intelligence (BI) 2.0 is helping business users create and modify their own reports, share and enrich information, and provide feedback to each other and to information producers.

When the community helps itself, information is turned into actionable information more quickly than when using purely “traditional” methods of community support, such as meetings, phone calls, and e-mail. And when actions are taken more quickly, the entire organization becomes more nimble and ultimately more competitive. This overview discusses how BI 2.0 can provide real benefits within your organization and what product features to look for in a BI solution in order to realize those benefits.

We hope you’ll find this guide a useful tool in determining which BI solution is best suited to your company’s business model and particular needs.


Table of Contents


Executive Overview
Using BI 2.0 to Increase your Competitive Advantage

Case Study
LogiXML Helps to Power its Real-Estate Reporting and Analysis

Thought Leadership
How Smart Marketers Succeed Online

Market Insight
Mashups and Pervasive BI

Report Sponsors
LogiXML

IBM

About TEC



Download the full copy of the TEC 2009 BI Buyer’s Guide for businesses.



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Using BI 2.0 to Increase Your Competitive Advantage


Business users know their data better than IT does. They know the meaning of the data, its history, and its relationship with other data. Yet traditional BI solutions have business users referring to IT for assistance with their data. Also, they are forced to work in silos. Sure, they can create their own reports and maybe even share them with other business users, but when it comes to sharing their own knowledge about the data, they have to rely on e-mail, telephone, and face-to-face meetings. By enabling the sharing of data-related knowledge through the BI system itself, business users become more self-sufficient and actions can be taken more quickly.

The raison d’être of BI is to provide business users with information that enables them to take action. Even if business users are self-sufficient when it comes to creating and sharing data, data on its own is rarely sufficient to take action. Identifying an opportunity in the market through numbers alone is not sufficient to justify investment in a new product or geography. Identifying a bottleneck in a business process is not sufficient to justify changes in the business process. Information about a business issue or opportunity is merely a part of the overall “solution domain.” Action is usually only taken after considering a number of factors in addition to the data, such as human knowledge and experience, the economic environment, and the competitive environment.

In this section, we lay out the capabilities to look for in a BI solution—and specific functional requirements needed to support these capabilities—that contribute to the goal of “harnessing collective intelligence.” In general, the more recent entrants into the BI market are paying the most attention to BI 2.0. Some vendors, such as Good Data, have it as a central component of their solution offerings.

The following are key capabilities of BI 2.0:

  • Collaboration
    Business users are able to share information within the user community and create discussion threads relating to the information.


  • Identification of useful information
    Business users can flag information that is likely to be of use to others within the community.


  • Enriching of Information
    Business users can enrich the information through their knowledge and experience in addition to other external information sources in order to explain trends and generally assist other consumers of that information.


The community of “business users” needn’t be restricted to internal users. User collaboration is already mature within the Web space, under the guise of Web 2.0. With Web 2.0, collective intelligence is harnessed through comments on blog posts; contributions to wikis such as Wikipedia; and tagging of content, such as photos on Flickr. BI 2.0 takes these methods and applies them in the BI space by making data the focus of user collaboration.

The following sections take the capabilities above and list the functional requirements that support them. Bear in mind that each of these functional requirements is a business user requirement and not an IT or development requirement.


Download the full copy of the TEC 2009 BI Buyer’s Guide for businesses.

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Combining the Flexibility of Public-Cloud Apps with the Security of Private-Cloud Data


Cloud applications are a priority for every business—the technology is flexible, easy-to-use, and offers compelling economic benefits. The challenge is that cloud applications increase the potential for corporate data to leak, raising compliance and security concerns for IT. A primary security concern facing organizations moving to the cloud is how to secure and control access to data saved in cloud applications.

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Confessions of a Techno Junkie


Ideas on how to survive the avalanche of technology, avoid the lure of its pitfalls, and succeed with it as the enabler to true process innovation.

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Is IoT Changing the Face of Omnichannel Retail?


Omnichannel retail has forever changed the face of retail. And now, another recent innovation, the Internet of Things, is poised to change the face of retail—once again. TEC CRM analyst Raluca Druta keys in on how she envisions this relationship to unfold in the preamble to the full discussion on the topic later this month on ERP Conversation Live.

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Development of an Internet Payment Processing System


This article describes the author's experience with the development of the first Yugoslav Internet payment processing system. The system's architecture is very similar to the Three Domain (3D) model that started to emerge later. This success story is worthwhile sharing with a wider audience.

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Quoting and Costing for Multiple Units of Measure


A common need of plastics producers is real-time shop floor production monitoring. This serves many purposes, including tracking cycles on tools or machines, data collection, precision measurement, analysis and reporting, gage management, and material usage and labor tracking.

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Subtle (or Not-so-subtle) Nuances of Microsoft .NET Enablement


The Microsoft .NET strategy continues to confuse many, due to the lack of understanding of the technology. Indeed, because of the massive marketing campaign undertaken by Microsoft, many vendors have adopted a "too liberal" approach to marketing .NET Framework-based initiatives.

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