X
Software Functionality Revealed in Detail
We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.
Get free sample report

Compare Software Solutions
Visit the TEC store to compare leading software solutions by funtionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.
Compare Now
 

 examples of bibliographic databases


Examples of Microsoft .NET Enablement
SYSPRO and Epicor are examples of .NET-enabled legacy software systems that have partly been componentized (rewritten), with

examples of bibliographic databases  .NET Enablement Some .NET-enabled Examples The Microsoft .NET environment includes what a business might need to develop and deploy a Web service-connected information technology (IT) architecture: smart clients, servers to host Web services, development tools to create them, applications to use them, and a worldwide network of more than 35,000 Microsoft Certified Partner organizations to provide any help users might need. Part Two of the series Subtle (or Not-so-subtle) Nuances of Microsoft .NET

Read More


Software Functionality Revealed in Detail

We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.

Get free sample report
Compare Software Solutions

Visit the TEC store to compare leading software by functionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.

Compare Now

Business Process Management (BPM)

Business process management (BPM) defines, enables, and manages the exchange of enterprise information through the semantics of a business process view, which involves employees, customers, partners, applications, and databases.  

Start Now

Documents related to » examples of bibliographic databases

Microsoft .NET-managed Code Enablement: Examples and Challenges


Intuitive, Visibility, and Epicor offer .NET Framework-managed code products, but their "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" mindset might work against them unless they can prove higher value propositions, such as new, more quickly developed vertical functionality.

examples of bibliographic databases   Read More

The Lexicon of CRM - Part 2: From J to Q


C.R.M. itself is an acronym, standing for Customer Relationship Management. This is part two of a three-part article to provide explanation and meaning for most of the common CRM phraseology. Here, in alphabetical order, we continue the Lexicon of CRM.

examples of bibliographic databases   Read More

State of the Market: HR


Despite predictions that it would be subsumed by enterprise resource planning (ERP) vendors encroaching from above and automation vendors encroaching from below, the manufacturing execution systems (MES) market has been growing steadily. This guide from TEC and Flexware Innovation provides state-of-the-market analysis, success stories from your peers, in-depth information on solutions, and a spotlight on leading vendors.

The products covered in this guide address the management of a company’s workforce, including hiring, payroll, benefits, training, health and safety, and more.

While HRIS are also commonly referred to as human resource management systems (HRMS) or as human capital management (HCM), for the purpose of this guide, we will refer to the systems that support HR functionality as HRIS throughout. All these systems—in one way or another—encompass core HR functionality.

We’ve included customer success stories to illustrate how the various HR solutions have helped companies like yours solve personnel, payroll, and benefit management problems.

For your convenience, there is also a vendor directory to assist companies looking for an HRIS, whether it’s an end-to-end on-premise solution, an on-demand or software-as-a-service (SaaS) solution, a third party solution, or a best-of-breed solution.

We hope you’ll find this guide a useful tool in determining which HRIS is best suited to your company’s business model and particular needs.


Table of Contents


Introduction

State of the Midsize HR Marketplace

Executive Summary: Core HR

Thou Shalt Manage Human Capital Better

Customer Success Story: Core HR

Nikon Reaps Benefits from Ultimate Software’s Ultipro

Executive Summary: Human Capital Management

Tactical Human Resources Evolves into Strategic Human Capital Management

Customer Success Story: Talent Management

Commerce Bank is Counting on Lawson

Vendor Spotlight

Auxillium West

Ceridian Canada Limited

CheckPoint HR

Lawson

NuView Systems, Inc.

Sage Software

Ultimate Software

Unicorn HRO


Download the full copy of the TEC 2008 HR Buyer’s Guide for SMBs.



Report Preview


State of the HR Marketplace


For many years, HR management has been viewed as the enterprise function responsible for staffing and personnel-related issues, such as recruiting and hiring, establishing employment policies, handling pay and retirement plans, and administering benefits. Today, company executives see the HR function in an entirely different way. From recruiting, hiring, and training new staff, to the transfer of key functions from the back office to the front line, it is evident that executives are looking to transform HR from a seemingly low-priority function into a strategic and vital part of the business.

What is fueling this transformation is that SMB executives are beginning to understand the critical link between their people and the bottom line. To remain competitive as an SMB in today’s job market, employers need to know what their employees are doing, what skills they have, their ambitions, how they are progressing, and how they fit into the future of the business.

SMBs that continue to view HR as strictly a department or administrative service and that fail to infuse HR functions throughout the organization will inevitably limit their ability to compete and grow.

We’ll review some of the trends in the HR space, as well as some of the challenges facing SMBs in the wake of globalization and the changing HR landscape.


Download the full copy of the TEC 2008 HR buyers guide for SMBs.

examples of bibliographic databases   Read More

BI State of the Market Report


IT departments rarely know as much about a business as the business people themselves. But business people rarely take action on numbers alone: they share the information with others, soliciting their feedback and performing external research before taking action. Business users still depend on IT to deliver answers related to the information that they receive. Business intelligence (BI) 2.0—also known as collaborative BI—uses the collective intelligence of the user community to enrich existing information. Learn how business intelligence (BI) 2.0 is helping business users create and modify their own reports, share and enrich information, and provide feedback to each other and to information producers.

When the community helps itself, information is turned into actionable information more quickly than when using purely “traditional” methods of community support, such as meetings, phone calls, and e-mail. And when actions are taken more quickly, the entire organization becomes more nimble and ultimately more competitive. This overview discusses how BI 2.0 can provide real benefits within your organization and what product features to look for in a BI solution in order to realize those benefits.

We hope you’ll find this guide a useful tool in determining which BI solution is best suited to your company’s business model and particular needs.


Table of Contents


Executive Overview
Using BI 2.0 to Increase your Competitive Advantage

Case Study
LogiXML Helps to Power its Real-Estate Reporting and Analysis

Thought Leadership
How Smart Marketers Succeed Online

Market Insight
Mashups and Pervasive BI

Report Sponsors
LogiXML

IBM

About TEC



Download the full copy of the TEC 2009 BI Buyer’s Guide for businesses.



Report Preview


Using BI 2.0 to Increase Your Competitive Advantage


Business users know their data better than IT does. They know the meaning of the data, its history, and its relationship with other data. Yet traditional BI solutions have business users referring to IT for assistance with their data. Also, they are forced to work in silos. Sure, they can create their own reports and maybe even share them with other business users, but when it comes to sharing their own knowledge about the data, they have to rely on e-mail, telephone, and face-to-face meetings. By enabling the sharing of data-related knowledge through the BI system itself, business users become more self-sufficient and actions can be taken more quickly.

The raison d’être of BI is to provide business users with information that enables them to take action. Even if business users are self-sufficient when it comes to creating and sharing data, data on its own is rarely sufficient to take action. Identifying an opportunity in the market through numbers alone is not sufficient to justify investment in a new product or geography. Identifying a bottleneck in a business process is not sufficient to justify changes in the business process. Information about a business issue or opportunity is merely a part of the overall “solution domain.” Action is usually only taken after considering a number of factors in addition to the data, such as human knowledge and experience, the economic environment, and the competitive environment.

In this section, we lay out the capabilities to look for in a BI solution—and specific functional requirements needed to support these capabilities—that contribute to the goal of “harnessing collective intelligence.” In general, the more recent entrants into the BI market are paying the most attention to BI 2.0. Some vendors, such as Good Data, have it as a central component of their solution offerings.

The following are key capabilities of BI 2.0:

  • Collaboration
    Business users are able to share information within the user community and create discussion threads relating to the information.


  • Identification of useful information
    Business users can flag information that is likely to be of use to others within the community.


  • Enriching of Information
    Business users can enrich the information through their knowledge and experience in addition to other external information sources in order to explain trends and generally assist other consumers of that information.


The community of “business users” needn’t be restricted to internal users. User collaboration is already mature within the Web space, under the guise of Web 2.0. With Web 2.0, collective intelligence is harnessed through comments on blog posts; contributions to wikis such as Wikipedia; and tagging of content, such as photos on Flickr. BI 2.0 takes these methods and applies them in the BI space by making data the focus of user collaboration.

The following sections take the capabilities above and list the functional requirements that support them. Bear in mind that each of these functional requirements is a business user requirement and not an IT or development requirement.


Download the full copy of the TEC 2009 BI Buyer’s Guide for businesses.

examples of bibliographic databases   Read More

SAP Remains One Of The Market’s Beacons Of Hope


On April 19, SAP announced upbeat results for Q1 2001, contradicting thereby the current market malaise. However, flat currency adjusted license revenue in the US and expected cascading economic slowdown from the US to other markets, may feel like a cutthroat competition, a loss of market share and the fact that not all troubles have been overcome.

examples of bibliographic databases   Read More

New Destinies: Stories of Outcomes Sensed, Predicted, and Changed in the World of the New Business Imperative


Remember 10 years ago, or maybe just 5, you used to have the luxury to think about your decisions. Not anymore. New rules apply to the global business environment. Those who choose real-time business intelligence are likely to gain the insight and agility to measure risk and reward in an instant—and move forward. Destiny is no longer in the hands of fate. It’s determined now, in a second. New outcomes await. Determine yours with business intelligence solutions from SAP.

examples of bibliographic databases   Read More

Business Answers at Your Fingertips: The Real-time Value of BI


This Aberdeen Research brief homes in on the critical time element of a best-in-class business intelligence (BI) strategy. The research shows that top performer are leveraging real-time of near real-time analytics to proactively manage their business and drive substantial performance improvements. Download this report for full details.

examples of bibliographic databases   Read More

The Wheres of Electronic Procurement


An overview of one of the central issues facing a deployment of e-procurement: Who controls the software?

examples of bibliographic databases   Read More

Working Together in the New World of Work


The new world of work is here. Businesses are already feeling the impact of a dispersed workforce, pervasive connectivity, and the watchful eyes of shareholders and government regulators. In such an environment, a more collaborative business is key to greater success. A robust communication and collaboration platform can add value to your workforce and help you turn the new world of work into a new world of opportunity.

examples of bibliographic databases   Read More

Benefits of Using a Master Data Management System


Master data management (MDM) comprises a set of processes and tools that define and manage the non-transactional data entities of an organization (also called reference data). MDM provides processes for consolidation, quality assurance, and distribution of such data throughout a company to ensure consistency and control in the ongoing maintenance and use of this information. Discover the benefits of an MDM system.

examples of bibliographic databases   Read More