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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail
We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.
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 examples of criteria


Examples of Microsoft .NET Enablement
SYSPRO and Epicor are examples of .NET-enabled legacy software systems that have partly been componentized (rewritten), with

examples of criteria  There are some good examples of .NET-enabled legacy software systems to which wrappers have been added to allow legacy functionality to be used and extended through Web services on the .NET Framework. In other words, at this more advanced level of .NET readiness, the legacy software system has a wrapper added which is a communication component created by an additional layer of code in the product. The wrapper is written in one of the .NET Framework languages, and by adding this wrapper, the legacy system

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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail

We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.

Get free sample report
Compare Software Solutions

Visit the TEC store to compare leading software by functionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.

Compare Now

Learning Management Suite (LMS)

These are tools for managing, creating, scheduling training or learning in your organization. The terminology varies from vendor to vendor. Learning management systems (LMS) typically help to manage both classroom and on-line learning. They do not normally include content creation or management tools but may in some cases. Some LMSs may manage just classroom or just e-learning rather than both. Some LMSs may also include content authoring and managment and virtual classrooms. Learning content management systems (LCMS) emphasize the management of content for courses/training/learning. In most cases, they include content authoring tools. In some cases, they may also include some of the features of LMSs. Content authoring tools are often provided as part of an LCMS. They may also be stand-alone products. Virtual classrooms (web conferencing tools) normally are separate third party offerings but may be included as part of a suite of tools. Suites of tools include features of at least two or more of the above categories. While some companies offer just LMS or LCMS systems others offer suites of products, which provide all or most of the features of the other tools. Suites combine several capabilities of learning management--usually two or more of the following: learning management, classroom training management, e-learning management, custom content creation, learning content management, learning object repositories, or virtual classrooms.  

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BI State of the Market Report


IT departments rarely know as much about a business as the business people themselves. But business people rarely take action on numbers alone: they share the information with others, soliciting their feedback and performing external research before taking action. Business users still depend on IT to deliver answers related to the information that they receive. Business intelligence (BI) 2.0—also known as collaborative BI—uses the collective intelligence of the user community to enrich existing information. Learn how business intelligence (BI) 2.0 is helping business users create and modify their own reports, share and enrich information, and provide feedback to each other and to information producers.

When the community helps itself, information is turned into actionable information more quickly than when using purely “traditional” methods of community support, such as meetings, phone calls, and e-mail. And when actions are taken more quickly, the entire organization becomes more nimble and ultimately more competitive. This overview discusses how BI 2.0 can provide real benefits within your organization and what product features to look for in a BI solution in order to realize those benefits.

We hope you’ll find this guide a useful tool in determining which BI solution is best suited to your company’s business model and particular needs.


Table of Contents


Executive Overview
Using BI 2.0 to Increase your Competitive Advantage

Case Study
LogiXML Helps to Power its Real-Estate Reporting and Analysis

Thought Leadership
How Smart Marketers Succeed Online

Market Insight
Mashups and Pervasive BI

Report Sponsors
LogiXML

IBM

About TEC



Download the full copy of the TEC 2009 BI Buyer’s Guide for businesses.



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Using BI 2.0 to Increase Your Competitive Advantage


Business users know their data better than IT does. They know the meaning of the data, its history, and its relationship with other data. Yet traditional BI solutions have business users referring to IT for assistance with their data. Also, they are forced to work in silos. Sure, they can create their own reports and maybe even share them with other business users, but when it comes to sharing their own knowledge about the data, they have to rely on e-mail, telephone, and face-to-face meetings. By enabling the sharing of data-related knowledge through the BI system itself, business users become more self-sufficient and actions can be taken more quickly.

The raison d’être of BI is to provide business users with information that enables them to take action. Even if business users are self-sufficient when it comes to creating and sharing data, data on its own is rarely sufficient to take action. Identifying an opportunity in the market through numbers alone is not sufficient to justify investment in a new product or geography. Identifying a bottleneck in a business process is not sufficient to justify changes in the business process. Information about a business issue or opportunity is merely a part of the overall “solution domain.” Action is usually only taken after considering a number of factors in addition to the data, such as human knowledge and experience, the economic environment, and the competitive environment.

In this section, we lay out the capabilities to look for in a BI solution—and specific functional requirements needed to support these capabilities—that contribute to the goal of “harnessing collective intelligence.” In general, the more recent entrants into the BI market are paying the most attention to BI 2.0. Some vendors, such as Good Data, have it as a central component of their solution offerings.

The following are key capabilities of BI 2.0:

  • Collaboration
    Business users are able to share information within the user community and create discussion threads relating to the information.


  • Identification of useful information
    Business users can flag information that is likely to be of use to others within the community.


  • Enriching of Information
    Business users can enrich the information through their knowledge and experience in addition to other external information sources in order to explain trends and generally assist other consumers of that information.


The community of “business users” needn’t be restricted to internal users. User collaboration is already mature within the Web space, under the guise of Web 2.0. With Web 2.0, collective intelligence is harnessed through comments on blog posts; contributions to wikis such as Wikipedia; and tagging of content, such as photos on Flickr. BI 2.0 takes these methods and applies them in the BI space by making data the focus of user collaboration.

The following sections take the capabilities above and list the functional requirements that support them. Bear in mind that each of these functional requirements is a business user requirement and not an IT or development requirement.


Download the full copy of the TEC 2009 BI Buyer’s Guide for businesses.

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Three Es of CRM


With product lifecycles accelerating and pricing pressures increasing, organizations must focus on delivering unique customer experiences to differentiate themselves from the competition. Customer relationship management and enterprise resource planning technologies play a critical enabling role.

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Paradoxes of Software Estimation


Software development has spawned an independent industry in its own right. But the processes of asking for service, offering service, and pricing are all somewhat haphazard. Perhaps it's time to focus efforts on resolving the key paradoxes of software estimation.

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11 Criteria for Selecting the Best ERP System Replacement


An enterprise resource planning (ERP) system is your information backbone, reaching into all areas of your business and value chain. That’s why replacing it can open unlimited business opportunities. The cornerstone of this effort is finding the right partner. And since your long-term business strategy will shape your selection, it’s critical that your ERP provider be part of your vision.

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Duty of Care Online


Useful reading for any online business, this white paper offers helpful hints for establishing comprehensive duty of care procedures. When setting up an online business, it is important to consider the legal aspects required—most importantly, an adequate privacy policy, and legally binding terms and conditions. Find out more.

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CRM Selections: When An Ounce Of Prevention Is Worth A Pound Of Cure Part One: The CRM Selection Challenge


Two of the greatest challenges IT decision makers face when selecting a CRM package is first, having a comprehensive understanding of their functional and technical requirements and second, identifying the vendors that best match their requirements. This article will focus on determining the functionality and technology required to enable business processes, and how to compare vendor offerings once those requirements have been documented.

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Wipro Point of View: Changing Nature of the Wealth Management Industry


The slump in the wealth management industry has its roots in the financial crisis in America and Europe. This has led to high-net-worth individuals (HNI) getting increasingly attracted to low risk, low management investments. Dr. Ashok Hegde, Global Head of Financial Services, Business Analyst Practice, Wipro, shares his expertise on the current challenges faced by and opportunities available to wealth managers. Read more.

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Infor’s Acquisition of PeopleAnswers Foregrounds Big Data Behavioral Analysis of Employees


Infor has announced the acquisition of PeopleAnswers, a company specializing in predictive talent analytics. PeopleAnswers’ application maps the behavioral DNA of organizations by analyzing 39 behavioral traits to reveal behaviors that drive success—as understood by each company.

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Out-of-the-box Integration


Is it is possible for small and medium businesses (SMBs) to achieve levels of application integration historically reserved for large enterprises with deep IT pockets? Duplication of data can be eliminated with the right electronic document management system (EDMS). Discover how an EDMS can be integrated with other core business applications to replace paper files and documents, driving efficiency and managing IT costs.

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New Destinies: Stories of Outcomes Sensed, Predicted, and Changed in the World of the New Business Imperative


Remember 10 years ago, or maybe just 5, you used to have the luxury to think about your decisions. Not anymore. New rules apply to the global business environment. Those who choose real-time business intelligence are likely to gain the insight and agility to measure risk and reward in an instant—and move forward. Destiny is no longer in the hands of fate. It’s determined now, in a second. New outcomes await. Determine yours with business intelligence solutions from SAP.

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