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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail
We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.
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 factors of influence in the design process


IT Sales Lead Generation: Understanding the Complex Sales Needs of the IT Industry
The sales lead generation process for technology companies is very different from lead generation in other industries. Technology sector needs are more precise,

factors of influence in the design process  sales process characterized by factors such as long sales cycles, multiple points of contact, potential political influences and significant investment on the part of the customer and the organization making the sale. Enterprise Prospecting ' A multi-stage process that allows a company to systematically narrow in on the correct individuals to speak to in an organisation, and subsequently discern the current or future fit for their services in the organisations they wish to prospect. Enterprise

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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail

We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.

Get free sample report
Compare Software Solutions

Visit the TEC store to compare leading software by functionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.

Compare Now

Core PLM for Process Industries

The foundation of product lifecycle management (PLM) for the process (or recipe-based) manufacturing industries is product data management (PDM). It covers design and product-related aspects of PLM including management of material specifications, recipes, formulas, production processes, design tools, document management, and collaboration. 

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Advancing the Art of Pricing with Science


Companies in search of a better, more precise method to determine the best prices for their products and to meet their margins, should harness statistical science to analyze transactions, and associated optimization algorithms to maximize revenues and profits.

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(Forgotten) CRM and ERP Kingdoms in the Making?


Enterprise resource planning (ERP) and customer relationship management (CRM) vendor Consona is determined to establish a CRM “kingdom” based on Consona Enterprise CRM. Read this comprehensive analysis of Consona Enterprise CRM to find out what lies ahead for this flagship product.

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Microsoft Axapta: Design Factors Shape System Usage Part Three: Manufacturing Environments


If you are implementing or considering Microsoft Axapta as your ERP system, or providing Axapta-related services, this note provides an overall understanding of how the system fits together to run a business. This section reviews the major design factors affecting system usage in a manufacturing environment.

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BI State of the Market Report


IT departments rarely know as much about a business as the business people themselves. But business people rarely take action on numbers alone: they share the information with others, soliciting their feedback and performing external research before taking action. Business users still depend on IT to deliver answers related to the information that they receive. Business intelligence (BI) 2.0—also known as collaborative BI—uses the collective intelligence of the user community to enrich existing information. Learn how business intelligence (BI) 2.0 is helping business users create and modify their own reports, share and enrich information, and provide feedback to each other and to information producers.

When the community helps itself, information is turned into actionable information more quickly than when using purely “traditional” methods of community support, such as meetings, phone calls, and e-mail. And when actions are taken more quickly, the entire organization becomes more nimble and ultimately more competitive. This overview discusses how BI 2.0 can provide real benefits within your organization and what product features to look for in a BI solution in order to realize those benefits.

We hope you’ll find this guide a useful tool in determining which BI solution is best suited to your company’s business model and particular needs.


Table of Contents


Executive Overview
Using BI 2.0 to Increase your Competitive Advantage

Case Study
LogiXML Helps to Power its Real-Estate Reporting and Analysis

Thought Leadership
How Smart Marketers Succeed Online

Market Insight
Mashups and Pervasive BI

Report Sponsors
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About TEC



Download the full copy of the TEC 2009 BI Buyer’s Guide for businesses.



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Using BI 2.0 to Increase Your Competitive Advantage


Business users know their data better than IT does. They know the meaning of the data, its history, and its relationship with other data. Yet traditional BI solutions have business users referring to IT for assistance with their data. Also, they are forced to work in silos. Sure, they can create their own reports and maybe even share them with other business users, but when it comes to sharing their own knowledge about the data, they have to rely on e-mail, telephone, and face-to-face meetings. By enabling the sharing of data-related knowledge through the BI system itself, business users become more self-sufficient and actions can be taken more quickly.

The raison d’être of BI is to provide business users with information that enables them to take action. Even if business users are self-sufficient when it comes to creating and sharing data, data on its own is rarely sufficient to take action. Identifying an opportunity in the market through numbers alone is not sufficient to justify investment in a new product or geography. Identifying a bottleneck in a business process is not sufficient to justify changes in the business process. Information about a business issue or opportunity is merely a part of the overall “solution domain.” Action is usually only taken after considering a number of factors in addition to the data, such as human knowledge and experience, the economic environment, and the competitive environment.

In this section, we lay out the capabilities to look for in a BI solution—and specific functional requirements needed to support these capabilities—that contribute to the goal of “harnessing collective intelligence.” In general, the more recent entrants into the BI market are paying the most attention to BI 2.0. Some vendors, such as Good Data, have it as a central component of their solution offerings.

The following are key capabilities of BI 2.0:

  • Collaboration
    Business users are able to share information within the user community and create discussion threads relating to the information.


  • Identification of useful information
    Business users can flag information that is likely to be of use to others within the community.


  • Enriching of Information
    Business users can enrich the information through their knowledge and experience in addition to other external information sources in order to explain trends and generally assist other consumers of that information.


The community of “business users” needn’t be restricted to internal users. User collaboration is already mature within the Web space, under the guise of Web 2.0. With Web 2.0, collective intelligence is harnessed through comments on blog posts; contributions to wikis such as Wikipedia; and tagging of content, such as photos on Flickr. BI 2.0 takes these methods and applies them in the BI space by making data the focus of user collaboration.

The following sections take the capabilities above and list the functional requirements that support them. Bear in mind that each of these functional requirements is a business user requirement and not an IT or development requirement.


Download the full copy of the TEC 2009 BI Buyer’s Guide for businesses.

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Nurturing the Cloud Ecosystem at the Acumatica Partner Summit 2014—Part One


TEC's P.J. Jakovljevic recently attended the Acumatica Partner Summit 2014 in Denver, Colorado, where the cloud ERP vendor’s partner ecosystem gathered to collaborate and explore all things Acumatica. In a series of posts, P.J. gives a short history of the company and overview of its partner channels, then explores Acumatica’s current focus on its partner network and where the company might be headed in the future.

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The Power to Get Sales Leads into the Hands of the Right Salespeople Quickly and Efficiently


Manufacturers and service companies are facing a blackhole in sales lead management: costing sales. By using a workflow for lead and opportunity management, that efficiently routing and tracking sales, sales efficiency will increase and produce a bigger pipeline, and more sales will be closed.

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The Banking Industry: Planning the Road Ahead


Effective planning is integral to the success of a bank. It helps define and ensure the achievement of the organization’s objectives. Understanding and implementing the planning cycle, which leverages forecasting, operational metrics, and multidimensional analyses can help management determine the feasibility of a strategy. An enterprise-wide, integrated planning and forecasting environment that reaches business units, products, customer segments, and geographies can align non-financial performance targets with high-level financial targets and help banks meet their goals.

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Back to the Future—Revisiting Capital and the Bank of Tomorrow


Over the decades there have been many views on what the bank of the future would be. Some ideas have been radical and some have been transitional, while others never really took hold. It just might be that what we need for the bank of tomorrow is not a new model, but rather one that takes inspiration from the bank of yesterday. Download this paper and find out more.

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The Superstar CFO: After the Crisis


In 2007, CFO Research Services published The Superstar CFO, a study documenting the attributes of highly successful chief financial officers (CFOs). Since then, the world has been shaken by financial, political, and natural upheavals that have altered the economic landscape. This report explores how these changes may be affecting companies’ efforts to transform corporate finance into a value-added partner to the business.

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The TCO of BI: The QlikView Customer Experience


Total cost of ownership (TCO) analysis allows organizations to provide a like-for-like comparison between various solutions for the same project. Assuming that the benefits of a project would be the same regardless of the solution, the solution with a lower TCO would therefore yield a higher ROI as well as faster payback. This IDC white paper provides a TCO analysis of the QlikView business intelligence (BI) solution.

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