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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail
We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.
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Visit the TEC store to compare leading software solutions by funtionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.
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 hierarchy chart examples


EAM versus CMMS: What's Right for Your Company
This article looks at where computerized maintenance management systems (CMMS) end and enterprise asset management (EAM) takes over, focusing on features and

hierarchy chart examples  EAM Database structure and hierarchy Repair parts availability Manpower resource availability Purchase requisition Preventive maintenance scheduling Cost accumulation and tracking Inception recording and tracking Standard and exception reporting Whole life asset care   Maintenance administration   Predictive maintenance analysis   Maintenance alternatives analysis   Physical asset risk management   Reliability-centered maintenance   Root cause analysis   Financial cost/life analysis   Technical

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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail

We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.

Get free sample report
Compare Software Solutions

Visit the TEC store to compare leading software by functionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.

Compare Now

Learning Management Suite (LMS)

These are tools for managing, creating, scheduling training or learning in your organization. The terminology varies from vendor to vendor. Learning management systems (LMS) typically help to manage both classroom and on-line learning. They do not normally include content creation or management tools but may in some cases. Some LMSs may manage just classroom or just e-learning rather than both. Some LMSs may also include content authoring and managment and virtual classrooms. Learning content management systems (LCMS) emphasize the management of content for courses/training/learning. In most cases, they include content authoring tools. In some cases, they may also include some of the features of LMSs. Content authoring tools are often provided as part of an LCMS. They may also be stand-alone products. Virtual classrooms (web conferencing tools) normally are separate third party offerings but may be included as part of a suite of tools. Suites of tools include features of at least two or more of the above categories. While some companies offer just LMS or LCMS systems others offer suites of products, which provide all or most of the features of the other tools. Suites combine several capabilities of learning management--usually two or more of the following: learning management, classroom training management, e-learning management, custom content creation, learning content management, learning object repositories, or virtual classrooms.  

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Reporting Tools


Analysis and reporting services are an important part of the enterprise resource planning process. Microsoft Dynamics NAV has been designed to give users options for optimal analysis and reporting, and to leave room for partners to provide customized solutions. With the correct reporting tools and Microsoft Dynamics NAV, practical analysis and reporting is available and adaptable to individual users’ needs.

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EAM Versus CMMS: What's Right for Your Company? Part One


As companies continue to look for more areas from which to squeeze out revenues and reduce expenses, enterprise asset management (EAM) and computerized maintenance management systems (CMMS) software continue to receive good press as the systems providing an answer--and with justification. But what software makes the most sense for your company and from which providers--EAM/CMMS best-of-breed incumbents or enterprise resource planning (ERP) "newcomers?" Read on to understand the key differentiators.

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A Case Study and Tutorial in Using IT Knowledge Based Tools Part 2: A Tutorial


This tutorial, part 2 of a two part series on Knowledge Based Selection, demonstrates the selection processes and capabilities of Knowledge Based Selection Methods and Tools. These tools, integrated with business decision making procedures, can arguably reduce selection risk and improve chances for success in IT projects. Given the appalling rate of IT project failures, selection can potentially help reduce risk in some 30% of cases, with an associated estimated cost of about $30B annually to industry according to some sources. In this tutorial, we illustrate a number of the procedures for rapid decision processing through the real-life selection of a PDA device. The process gave confidence to the argument to wait for the solution, while weighing risk against return.

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Vendors Harness Excel (and Office) to Win the Lower-end of Business Intelligence Market


Small and medium businesses wanting the benefits of business intelligence (BI) without having to implement a large enterprise system may find a viable option in Excel-based BI and analytics tools that leverage add-in applications from vendors.

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Choosing Between Linux and Microsoft Windows Using an Analytical Hierarchy Process


Because small to medium enterprises are limited in their resources, they must carefully consider which of the two major operating systems available—Microsoft Windows or Linux—will better serve their needs and be more cost-efficient to implement.

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IP Phone Comparison Chart: 2013 Edition


Is your company considering a voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) system? If so, how do you decide which system to purchase and from which vendor? The 2013 Edition of the IP Phone Comparison Chart compares the VoIP phone series offered by seven major providers on various features—including the types of models available, types of platforms supported, advanced features, target environment, among others. Download comparison chart.

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Welcome to ERP Showdown! Infor SyteLine vs. Exact Software Macola ES vs. QAD Enterprise Application


Today's ERP Showdown pits Infor SyteLine vs. Exact Software Macola ES vs. QAD Enterprise Application, all aimed at medium-sized businesses in the $250 million (USD)–plus range. Once again, we used TEC's ERP Evaluation Center to look at all eight standard ERP modules…

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Examples Of How Some Mid-Market Vendors Might Remain Within The Future Three (Dozen)?


While the ongoing consolidation frenzy is by no means the end of smaller vendors, the number of survivors will certainly be only a few dozen. Amid these ongoing seismic consolidation tremors, smaller application vendors are left with few choices: going private under a wealthy financial backer’s wing that is also committed to invest in the acquired technology, or snatching some prominent mid-market players within its market segment.

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Welcome to ERP Showdown: Infor ERP LN 6.1 vs. Epicor Vantage vs. Lawson M3 Discrete Manufacturing Solutions


I'm Larry Blitz, editor of TEC’s Vendor Showdown series. With enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems being the information backbone of the organization, we decided to take a closer look at three of the more popular discrete ERP solutions for the mid-market. Using TEC's ERP Evaluation Center, we compared Infor ERP LN 6.1, Epicor Vantage, and Lawson M3 Discrete Manufacturing Solutions head-to-head, based on the most recent data supplied to us by the three vendors.

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Microsoft .NET-managed Code Enablement: Examples and Challenges


Intuitive, Visibility, and Epicor offer .NET Framework-managed code products, but their "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" mindset might work against them unless they can prove higher value propositions, such as new, more quickly developed vertical functionality.

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