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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail
We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.
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Visit the TEC store to compare leading software solutions by funtionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.
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 history of scm


A Tale of a Few Good SCM Players - Part 4
Part 1 of this blog post series followed the genesis of Manhattan Associates from its inception in 1990 throughout the mid-2000s. During this time, Manhattan

history of scm  earnings quarter in its history at US$0.43 for Q3 2009. Conversely, JDA’s Q3 revenue was somewhat stagnant, while privately held RedPrairie did not disclose any performance for its Q3. Additionally, Manhattan’s stock is valued more highly than JDA’s, with a price-to-earnings (P/E) ratio nearly 80 percent higher.  Regarding the JDA acquiring Manhattan speculation, JDA would have to do that with cash because of Manhattan's high stock P/E ratio. JDA would have to raise a significant amount of cash in

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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail

We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.

Get free sample report
Compare Software Solutions

Visit the TEC store to compare leading software by functionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.

Compare Now

Supply Chain Management (SCM)

Supply chain management (SCM) solutions include applications for managing supplier, manufacturer, wholesaler, retailer, and customer business processes. Addressing demand management, warehouse management, international trade logistics, transportation execution, and many other issues for a complete solution, this knowledge base will support your evaluation of an SCM suite. 

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BI State of the Market Report


IT departments rarely know as much about a business as the business people themselves. But business people rarely take action on numbers alone: they share the information with others, soliciting their feedback and performing external research before taking action. Business users still depend on IT to deliver answers related to the information that they receive. Business intelligence (BI) 2.0—also known as collaborative BI—uses the collective intelligence of the user community to enrich existing information. Learn how business intelligence (BI) 2.0 is helping business users create and modify their own reports, share and enrich information, and provide feedback to each other and to information producers.

When the community helps itself, information is turned into actionable information more quickly than when using purely “traditional” methods of community support, such as meetings, phone calls, and e-mail. And when actions are taken more quickly, the entire organization becomes more nimble and ultimately more competitive. This overview discusses how BI 2.0 can provide real benefits within your organization and what product features to look for in a BI solution in order to realize those benefits.

We hope you’ll find this guide a useful tool in determining which BI solution is best suited to your company’s business model and particular needs.


Table of Contents


Executive Overview
Using BI 2.0 to Increase your Competitive Advantage

Case Study
LogiXML Helps to Power its Real-Estate Reporting and Analysis

Thought Leadership
How Smart Marketers Succeed Online

Market Insight
Mashups and Pervasive BI

Report Sponsors
LogiXML

IBM

About TEC



Download the full copy of the TEC 2009 BI Buyer’s Guide for businesses.



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Using BI 2.0 to Increase Your Competitive Advantage


Business users know their data better than IT does. They know the meaning of the data, its history, and its relationship with other data. Yet traditional BI solutions have business users referring to IT for assistance with their data. Also, they are forced to work in silos. Sure, they can create their own reports and maybe even share them with other business users, but when it comes to sharing their own knowledge about the data, they have to rely on e-mail, telephone, and face-to-face meetings. By enabling the sharing of data-related knowledge through the BI system itself, business users become more self-sufficient and actions can be taken more quickly.

The raison d’être of BI is to provide business users with information that enables them to take action. Even if business users are self-sufficient when it comes to creating and sharing data, data on its own is rarely sufficient to take action. Identifying an opportunity in the market through numbers alone is not sufficient to justify investment in a new product or geography. Identifying a bottleneck in a business process is not sufficient to justify changes in the business process. Information about a business issue or opportunity is merely a part of the overall “solution domain.” Action is usually only taken after considering a number of factors in addition to the data, such as human knowledge and experience, the economic environment, and the competitive environment.

In this section, we lay out the capabilities to look for in a BI solution—and specific functional requirements needed to support these capabilities—that contribute to the goal of “harnessing collective intelligence.” In general, the more recent entrants into the BI market are paying the most attention to BI 2.0. Some vendors, such as Good Data, have it as a central component of their solution offerings.

The following are key capabilities of BI 2.0:

  • Collaboration
    Business users are able to share information within the user community and create discussion threads relating to the information.


  • Identification of useful information
    Business users can flag information that is likely to be of use to others within the community.


  • Enriching of Information
    Business users can enrich the information through their knowledge and experience in addition to other external information sources in order to explain trends and generally assist other consumers of that information.


The community of “business users” needn’t be restricted to internal users. User collaboration is already mature within the Web space, under the guise of Web 2.0. With Web 2.0, collective intelligence is harnessed through comments on blog posts; contributions to wikis such as Wikipedia; and tagging of content, such as photos on Flickr. BI 2.0 takes these methods and applies them in the BI space by making data the focus of user collaboration.

The following sections take the capabilities above and list the functional requirements that support them. Bear in mind that each of these functional requirements is a business user requirement and not an IT or development requirement.


Download the full copy of the TEC 2009 BI Buyer’s Guide for businesses.

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Challenges of the Future: The Rebirth of Small Independent Retail in America


By any measure, retailers are overwhelming small businesses. More than 95 percent of all retailers have only one store. Almost 90 percent have sales less than $2.5 million (USD), and more than 98 percent have fewer than 100 employees. To compete, small businesses need to be innovative, and understand both personalization and value, and how to execute best practices to build success.

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The Evolution of the Last-mile Supply Chain


“Last-mile supply chain services” is an evolving segment of the supply chain industry, but a cutting-edge segment that has evolved as supply chain managers across the US struggle to cope with the inadequacies of the current globalized supply chain model. Learn five reasons why current supply chain models are flawed and how you can use a new architecture to balance supply chain risk, globalized sourcing, and economics.

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The Impact of Demand-Driven Technology in the SCM Market: IBS


The integration solutions market will be an interesting area of growth. IBS has an attractive offer for companies with complex and expensive business software at the group and headquarters level, wanting to lower costs and quicken implementation in their subsidiaries.

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Best-of-Breed Versus Complete CAD-PLM Suites: The Debate Rages On


The PLM world is currently witness to fervent debate on the most appropriate type of PLM/CAD software. Best-of-breed solutions offer the needed capabilities and hence integrate the necessary software modules as per the customer’s needs, whereas all-in-one CAD/PLM suites attempt a “one size fits all” approach. In his report, TEC principal analyst P.J. Jakovljevic provides his view on the intricacies of these two approaches.

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TEC 2013 Supply Chain Management (SCM) Market Survey Report


This report gives an overview of current considerations for organizations seeking to purchase a supply chain management (SCM) software solution. Based on aggregate data collected from more than 1,400 SCM software comparisons performed using Technology Evaluation Centers’ (TEC’s) TEC Advisor software selection application during 2012, the report details what TEC data reveals about your peers' requirements for SCM solutions, including functionalities, delivery models and access, customization and integration, server and database platforms, and budgeting.

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Collaboration 2.0: Taking Collaboration to the Next Level: From the E-mail and Document-centric World of 'Enterprise 1.0' to the People-Centric World of Enterprise 2.0


Most business collaboration continues to be conducted via e-mail and shared folders, but forward-looking organizations are increasingly considering socially oriented and real-time collaboration solutions to instantly and seamlessly increase productivity between employees, suppliers, customers, and stakeholders. This white paper discusses new products, services, and technologies entering the enterprise collaboration space.

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Busting Out of the Inbox: Five New Rules of 1to1® E-mail Marketing


Situating e-mail in a multichannel marketing plan is more complicated than it used to be. Where exactly does e-mail fit in the world of blogs, vlogs, and podcasts—where MSN, Google, and Yahoo! call the shots? Marketers need to understand which strategies and tactics are most effective to ensure that their e-mails will be delivered, opened, and acted upon.

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SAP SCM 4.0


SAP SCM 4.0 is the one solution platform that offers packaged application capabilities that grow with your organization, support your business requirements, and transform traditional supply chains into adaptive supply chain networks. SAP SCM 4.0 includes SAP Advanced Planning & Optimization (SAP APO), SAP Inventory Collaboration Hub (SAP ICH), and SAP Event Management (SAP EM).    

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Analysis of TeleCommunication Systems, Inc. Release of Menu Driven Wireless Web Capability For SMS


The advent of menu driven wireless web capabilities for SMS (Short Message Service) will allow carriers to offer their subscribers fully personalized web based menus for quick access to stock quotes and bi-directional transactions such as e-business or gaming.

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