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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail
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 how to write a terms of reference


The 2008 Handbook of Application Delivery: A Guide to Decision Making
IT organizations can no longer manage networks in isolation from the applications they support, requiring a shift from focusing on devices to a focus on

how to write a terms of reference  groups come to understand how to write applications that perform well over the WAN. Table 4.1, for example, depicts the results of a lab test that was done using a WAN emulator to quantify the affect that WAN latency would have on an inquiry-response application that has a target response time of 5 seconds. Similar tests can be run to quantify the affect that jitter and packet loss have on an application.   Network Latency Measured Response Time 0 ms 2 seconds 25 ms 2 seconds 50 ms 2 seconds 75 ms 2

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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail

We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.

Get free sample report
Compare Software Solutions

Visit the TEC store to compare leading software by functionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.

Compare Now

HCIMS - Clinical Information System RFI/RFP Template

ADT (admission, discharge, and transfer), Global Requirements, Patient Information, Orders, Plan of Care, Work Plan, Kardex and Summary, Flow Sheets and Vitals, MAR and Medications, Critical Care, L&D Fetal Monitoring, Clinical Record, Reference and Reports, HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act), Interfaces, Ease of Use, Technical and Support, and Product Technology  

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An Introduction to E-learning and Learning Management Systems (LMS)


Not so long ago (or, back in the early ’90s, when I was a first-year college student) there were two ways to get a post-secondary education: by attending classes at a university or college with hundreds of other coffee-stoked students, or by signing up for what used to be called “distance” learning (or even before that, “by correspondence,” as though courses consisted of a series of letters

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Is There a Smarter Way to Handle Excess Active and Obsolete Inventory?


Imagine the convenience of a 24x7 intranet marketplace where companies could sell off their inventory to the highest bidder. FreeFlow is one such business service provider, helping companies find buyers to sell their products to and increase inventory asset recovery.

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Five Things to Understand About Your Nexus Footprint


The complexities and fluidities of sales tax nexus can be overwhelming and require the constant attention of a tax expert to navigate, but most small to medium businesses (SMBs) cannot afford that kind of resource internally. Meanwhile, the penalties for undercollecting, underreporting, and underpaying sales tax can be huge. Learn more about nexus issues and how they can impact your business—and your bottom line.

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BI State of the Market Report


IT departments rarely know as much about a business as the business people themselves. But business people rarely take action on numbers alone: they share the information with others, soliciting their feedback and performing external research before taking action. Business users still depend on IT to deliver answers related to the information that they receive. Business intelligence (BI) 2.0—also known as collaborative BI—uses the collective intelligence of the user community to enrich existing information. Learn how business intelligence (BI) 2.0 is helping business users create and modify their own reports, share and enrich information, and provide feedback to each other and to information producers.

When the community helps itself, information is turned into actionable information more quickly than when using purely “traditional” methods of community support, such as meetings, phone calls, and e-mail. And when actions are taken more quickly, the entire organization becomes more nimble and ultimately more competitive. This overview discusses how BI 2.0 can provide real benefits within your organization and what product features to look for in a BI solution in order to realize those benefits.

We hope you’ll find this guide a useful tool in determining which BI solution is best suited to your company’s business model and particular needs.


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Executive Overview
Using BI 2.0 to Increase your Competitive Advantage

Case Study
LogiXML Helps to Power its Real-Estate Reporting and Analysis

Thought Leadership
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About TEC



Download the full copy of the TEC 2009 BI Buyer’s Guide for businesses.



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Using BI 2.0 to Increase Your Competitive Advantage


Business users know their data better than IT does. They know the meaning of the data, its history, and its relationship with other data. Yet traditional BI solutions have business users referring to IT for assistance with their data. Also, they are forced to work in silos. Sure, they can create their own reports and maybe even share them with other business users, but when it comes to sharing their own knowledge about the data, they have to rely on e-mail, telephone, and face-to-face meetings. By enabling the sharing of data-related knowledge through the BI system itself, business users become more self-sufficient and actions can be taken more quickly.

The raison d’être of BI is to provide business users with information that enables them to take action. Even if business users are self-sufficient when it comes to creating and sharing data, data on its own is rarely sufficient to take action. Identifying an opportunity in the market through numbers alone is not sufficient to justify investment in a new product or geography. Identifying a bottleneck in a business process is not sufficient to justify changes in the business process. Information about a business issue or opportunity is merely a part of the overall “solution domain.” Action is usually only taken after considering a number of factors in addition to the data, such as human knowledge and experience, the economic environment, and the competitive environment.

In this section, we lay out the capabilities to look for in a BI solution—and specific functional requirements needed to support these capabilities—that contribute to the goal of “harnessing collective intelligence.” In general, the more recent entrants into the BI market are paying the most attention to BI 2.0. Some vendors, such as Good Data, have it as a central component of their solution offerings.

The following are key capabilities of BI 2.0:

  • Collaboration
    Business users are able to share information within the user community and create discussion threads relating to the information.


  • Identification of useful information
    Business users can flag information that is likely to be of use to others within the community.


  • Enriching of Information
    Business users can enrich the information through their knowledge and experience in addition to other external information sources in order to explain trends and generally assist other consumers of that information.


The community of “business users” needn’t be restricted to internal users. User collaboration is already mature within the Web space, under the guise of Web 2.0. With Web 2.0, collective intelligence is harnessed through comments on blog posts; contributions to wikis such as Wikipedia; and tagging of content, such as photos on Flickr. BI 2.0 takes these methods and applies them in the BI space by making data the focus of user collaboration.

The following sections take the capabilities above and list the functional requirements that support them. Bear in mind that each of these functional requirements is a business user requirement and not an IT or development requirement.


Download the full copy of the TEC 2009 BI Buyer’s Guide for businesses.

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In Search of Clarity: Unraveling the Complexities of Executive Decision Making


Decision making is at the core of all business activity, as executives set strategy and manage operations by weighing a vast array of factors to arrive at the desired balance of risk and reward. But enormous growth in a company’s size and operations adds complexity to decision-making processes. Learn about the five ingredients of good decision making, according to the responses of 154 executives in a global survey.

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Glossary of Enterprise Applications Terminology Part One: Accounts Payable Through Internet


As enterprise applications systems developed over time, a continuous stream of new terminology surfaced. This is a glossary of those terms.

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Challenges of the Future: The Rebirth of Small Independent Retail in America


By any measure, retailers are overwhelming small businesses. More than 95 percent of all retailers have only one store. Almost 90 percent have sales less than $2.5 million (USD), and more than 98 percent have fewer than 100 employees. To compete, small businesses need to be innovative, and understand both personalization and value, and how to execute best practices to build success.

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Forecasting Total Cost of Ownership for Initial Deployments of Server Blades


For organizations deploying many servers, total cost of ownership (TCO) analyses favor blade over rack-optimized systems. Blade server systems—reducing both capital and operating expenses—exploit economies of scale when deploying servers in volume. Saving power, cooling, and space by more than 25 percent, the blade advantage is particularly relevant for servers working in conjunction with storage area networks (SANs).

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AKG of America


AKG of America needed an open system based on industry standards, and one that was packaged, not custom developed. AKG also needed a system with enough flexibility to sustain growth. Find out why AKG chose Infor Visual.

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Instead of Discounting, Back Some Value Out of Your Proposal


Last minute discounting has become so prevalent that many companies have come to depend on it as their default sales strategy. Employing a go-to-market strategy of being the lowest cost provider is one thing, but dramatic, tactical discounting on every deal will erode your company's margins and leave you digging a deeper and deeper hole in which your company will ultimately bury itself.

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