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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail
We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.
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Compare Software Solutions
Visit the TEC store to compare leading software solutions by funtionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.
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 kinds of reporting


What Is Reporting? The Answer Might Surprise You
For medium-sized companies and large enterprises, reports typically are generated through reporting software. At its core, a report is simply a representation

kinds of reporting  now present their data—more kinds of data—with greater ease. Download this white paper to learn more.

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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail

We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.

Get free sample report
Compare Software Solutions

Visit the TEC store to compare leading software by functionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.

Compare Now

Sales Force Automation (SFA)

Sales Force Automation (SFA) systems help sales and marketing teams with functions related to taking orders, generating proposals or quotes, managing territories, managing partners, and maintaining contact data. Systems often include various levels of analytic and reporting capabilities. 

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Documents related to » kinds of reporting

State of the MES Software Marketplace


Despite predictions that it would be subsumed by enterprise resource planning (ERP) vendors encroaching from above and automation vendors encroaching from below, the manufacturing execution systems (MES) market has been growing steadily. This guide from TEC and Flexware Innovation provides state-of-the-market analysis, success stories from your peers, in-depth information on solutions, and a spotlight on leading vendors.

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BI State of the Market Report


IT departments rarely know as much about a business as the business people themselves. But business people rarely take action on numbers alone: they share the information with others, soliciting their feedback and performing external research before taking action. Business users still depend on IT to deliver answers related to the information that they receive. Business intelligence (BI) 2.0—also known as collaborative BI—uses the collective intelligence of the user community to enrich existing information. Learn how business intelligence (BI) 2.0 is helping business users create and modify their own reports, share and enrich information, and provide feedback to each other and to information producers.

When the community helps itself, information is turned into actionable information more quickly than when using purely “traditional” methods of community support, such as meetings, phone calls, and e-mail. And when actions are taken more quickly, the entire organization becomes more nimble and ultimately more competitive. This overview discusses how BI 2.0 can provide real benefits within your organization and what product features to look for in a BI solution in order to realize those benefits.

We hope you’ll find this guide a useful tool in determining which BI solution is best suited to your company’s business model and particular needs.


Table of Contents


Executive Overview
Using BI 2.0 to Increase your Competitive Advantage

Case Study
LogiXML Helps to Power its Real-Estate Reporting and Analysis

Thought Leadership
How Smart Marketers Succeed Online

Market Insight
Mashups and Pervasive BI

Report Sponsors
LogiXML

IBM

About TEC



Download the full copy of the TEC 2009 BI Buyer’s Guide for businesses.



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Using BI 2.0 to Increase Your Competitive Advantage


Business users know their data better than IT does. They know the meaning of the data, its history, and its relationship with other data. Yet traditional BI solutions have business users referring to IT for assistance with their data. Also, they are forced to work in silos. Sure, they can create their own reports and maybe even share them with other business users, but when it comes to sharing their own knowledge about the data, they have to rely on e-mail, telephone, and face-to-face meetings. By enabling the sharing of data-related knowledge through the BI system itself, business users become more self-sufficient and actions can be taken more quickly.

The raison d’être of BI is to provide business users with information that enables them to take action. Even if business users are self-sufficient when it comes to creating and sharing data, data on its own is rarely sufficient to take action. Identifying an opportunity in the market through numbers alone is not sufficient to justify investment in a new product or geography. Identifying a bottleneck in a business process is not sufficient to justify changes in the business process. Information about a business issue or opportunity is merely a part of the overall “solution domain.” Action is usually only taken after considering a number of factors in addition to the data, such as human knowledge and experience, the economic environment, and the competitive environment.

In this section, we lay out the capabilities to look for in a BI solution—and specific functional requirements needed to support these capabilities—that contribute to the goal of “harnessing collective intelligence.” In general, the more recent entrants into the BI market are paying the most attention to BI 2.0. Some vendors, such as Good Data, have it as a central component of their solution offerings.

The following are key capabilities of BI 2.0:

  • Collaboration
    Business users are able to share information within the user community and create discussion threads relating to the information.


  • Identification of useful information
    Business users can flag information that is likely to be of use to others within the community.


  • Enriching of Information
    Business users can enrich the information through their knowledge and experience in addition to other external information sources in order to explain trends and generally assist other consumers of that information.


The community of “business users” needn’t be restricted to internal users. User collaboration is already mature within the Web space, under the guise of Web 2.0. With Web 2.0, collective intelligence is harnessed through comments on blog posts; contributions to wikis such as Wikipedia; and tagging of content, such as photos on Flickr. BI 2.0 takes these methods and applies them in the BI space by making data the focus of user collaboration.

The following sections take the capabilities above and list the functional requirements that support them. Bear in mind that each of these functional requirements is a business user requirement and not an IT or development requirement.


Download the full copy of the TEC 2009 BI Buyer’s Guide for businesses.

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PLM Coming of Age: ERP Vendors Take Notice


With a PLM solution in place, a company has the ability to automate, monitor, and track product development and revision processes with their customers, suppliers, and employees amid the increasing pressures of mass customization, globalization, regulatory compliance, outsourcing, and product accountability, which are just some market driving forces.

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Reporting for Midsize Companies: Empower Your Business with Self-service Reporting


Business reporting is a priority for IT and business users at midsize companies. These companies, lean on resources, need a single reporting solution that addresses a full range of reporting requirements and users. Discover complete reporting solutions that can recognize and accommodate different kinds of users, provide complete coverage for all types of reports, and access all enterprise data, regardless of the source.

kinds of reporting   Read More

Technology Evaluation Centers Mourns Loss of Chairman, Marcel Côté


It was with great sadness that TEC learned of the death of Marcel Côté, chairman of TEC’s board of directors.

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Ad Hoc Reporting


Find out why ad hoc reporting has become a critical component of the business intelligence (BI) environment—and learn how easy it is to make this type of analysis possible for the everyday business user. Along with an overview of the benefits of ad hoc reporting, this white paper will show you how the New York City Health Department makes reporting easy for its users, while eliminating the backlog of report requests for IT.

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Infor’s Acquisition of PeopleAnswers Foregrounds Big Data Behavioral Analysis of Employees


Infor has announced the acquisition of PeopleAnswers, a company specializing in predictive talent analytics. PeopleAnswers’ application maps the behavioral DNA of organizations by analyzing 39 behavioral traits to reveal behaviors that drive success—as understood by each company.

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Justification of ERP Investments Part Two: The Intangible Effects of ERP


The intangible or non-financial benefits of an integrated enterprise resource planning (ERP) system can be viewed from several perspectives. For illustrative purposes, the discussion will focus on the benefits for accounting, product and process design, production, sales, and management information system MIS functions. From the overall company standpoint, ERP provides a framework for working effectively together and providing a consistent plan for action. Reprinted from Maximizing Your ERP System by Dr. Scott Hamilton.

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The Many Faces of PLM Part Two: The Future of the PLM Suite


The future of the PLM Suite will include more applications that cover product-related functionality and further expand the benefits available. As the PLM Suite matures, companies will benefit from increased functionality and increased integration between business processes. The ultimate expression of this more mature solution will result in a broad suite of focused, integrated applications that leverage a core of unified, structured product data - the PLM Platform.

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Wipro Point of View: Changing Nature of the Wealth Management Industry


The slump in the wealth management industry has its roots in the financial crisis in America and Europe. This has led to high-net-worth individuals (HNI) getting increasingly attracted to low risk, low management investments. Dr. Ashok Hegde, Global Head of Financial Services, Business Analyst Practice, Wipro, shares his expertise on the current challenges faced by and opportunities available to wealth managers. Read more.

kinds of reporting   Read More