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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail
We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.
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 large enterprises


Announcing the 2013 TEC CRM Buyer’s Guide for Medium and Large Enterprises
We are pleased to announce the launch of TEC’s first buyer’s guide of 2013: CRM for Medium and Large Enterprises. Download your free PDF copy now.This buyer

large enterprises  Guide for Medium and Large Enterprises We are pleased to announce the launch of TEC’s first buyer’s guide of 2013: CRM for Medium and Large Enterprises. Download your free PDF copy now. This buyer’s guide provides in-depth insight from TEC CRM analyst Raluca Druta on a how a comprehensive customer relationship management (CRM) system can help medium and large enterprises better understand and address their customers’ needs and challenges. With three points of contact with prospects and clients—i

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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail

We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.

Get free sample report
Compare Software Solutions

Visit the TEC store to compare leading software by functionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.

Compare Now

Quote-to-Order (Q2O) Systems

Quote-to-order (Q2O) solutions (sometimes known as configure, price, and quote or CPQ) enable manufacturers to mobilize their mass customization initiatives. These systems can reduce time-consuming quoting and ordering processes, decrease unit costs, and lower sales costs. Q2O suites can further help enterprises increase sales effectiveness across all channels. These solutions help companies that sell complex products and services shift their focus to customer-facing sales and service issues. 

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Documents related to » large enterprises

Lean Principles for Implementing ERP in Midsize and Large Enterprises


Lean Consulting just makes sense. Elimination of nonvalue-add activities and personnel, along with streamlined processes and a roles-based implementation methodology will always reduce wasted time and money. It’s a model that can deliver implementations on budget and on time consistently.

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TEC 2013 CRM Buyer's Guide for Medium and Large Enterprises


Great customer service is the best (some say the only) way to truly stand out from the competition. CRM vendors are helping companies rise to the challenge with new tools for building and measuring relationships. In the 2013 TEC CRM Buyer’s Guide, analyst Raluca Druta walks you through the latest CRM developments and looks at how trends like customer experience management, mobility, and social media integration are changing the way companies do business.

Customer relationship management (CRM) solutions for medium and large enterprises need to be able to accommodate large numbers of complex CRM demands. Medium- and largesized companies often operate across several countries and/or continents and therefore need to harmonize their customers’ efforts and opinions across their respective cultures and geographies. In response to this reality, medium and large enterprises require cohesive systems that allow for coherent customer relationship management.

A cohesive CRM system ensures that there are no repetitions and inadequacies in interactions with customers. A thorough understanding of how the customer moves through the company’s offerings and services is also essential. If the customer experience is grasped correctly, insight can be gained into how internal employees and external partners have responded to customers and the level of satisfaction that the customer has derived from those interactions.

Here is a look at how a cohesive CRM system should work from the perspective of all three points of contact comprised by a CRM system (i.e., sales, marketing, and customer support).

For the purposes of this buyer’s guide, medium and large enterprises are defined as those organizations that have more than 500 employees and more than $100 million (USD) in annual revenue.


Table of Contents


Preface

The Business Need for CRM

The Features and Functions of CRM for Enterprises

CRM Vendors’ Approach to Addressing Customer-related Challenges

Conclusion

Vendor Solutions


TEC Resources for CRM for Medium and Large Enterprises

TEC Selection Project: ”Antiquated” CRM System Lags behind Mobile Salesforce


Casebook

KANA Thought Leadership: Building a Profitable Multi-channel Customer Service Experience

Mydex Thought Leadership: A New Personal Information Management Ecosystem

NetSuite Thought Leadership: Several Key Functional Criteria for Evaluating CRM Applications

ANALEC Customer Success Story: ANALEC ClientManager Empowers a Global Investment Bank’s Brokerage Business to Proactively Manage Its Customer Needs and Intelligently Allocate Resources to Boost Profitability

Avidian Technologies Customer Success Story: Elobau Increases Productivity with CRM Software from Avidian Technologies

BPMonline Customer Success Story: Multinational Software Company Uses BPMonline to Optimize and Control Processes

Microsoft Dynamics CRM and Ignify Customer Success Story: Global Electronic Systems Company Uses Microsoft Dynamics CRM to Manage Sales and Customer Service Operations

KANA Customer Success Story: Telkomsel: Breaking Down Barriers with Exceptional Customer Service

NetSuite Customer Success Story: Prudential Locations Enjoys Skyrocketing Agent Productivity with NetSuite CRM+

Salesforce Customer Success Story: First Data Selects Salesforce to Improve Lead Management

SAP Customer Success Story: Customer Intimacy and Lower Costs Go Hand-in-Hand at Yaskawa

SAP Customer Success Story: Nebraska Book Company: Starting a New Chapter in Its Business with SAP® Sales OnDemand

UBA Service Center for Sage CRM Customer Success Story: UBA Service Center for Sage CRM Gives KIA Dealers in Jordan and Iraq a 360-Degree View of Sales, Service Center, and Back-office Integration

Yunano Customer Success Story: Shenzhen Artron Color Printing Co., Ltd. Selects Yonyou CRM System


TEC Partners Resources Directory

Vendor Directory


Download the full copy of the TEC 2013 CRM Buyer’s Guide for Medium and Large Enterprises.



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The Features and Functions of CRM for Enterprises


Product Technology: Integration

As the business needs for medium and large enterprises set these organizations apart from others, vendors propose CRM software solutions for enterprises that address these particular needs. In this section we will look at CRM for enterprises from two points of view: product technology and functionality.

Most vendors of CRM solutions for enterprises tend to offer complex functionality within a single solution or through integration with other solutions developed by the same vendor or its partners. Nevertheless, with the explosion of CRM niche solutions, medium and large enterprises might be tempted to buy several software solutions from different vendors to manage their CRM requirements. While sometimes they don’t have a choice, this can cause several potential integration problems.

The first set of problems that can be encountered is at the database level. Conflicts might appear between different types of databases (Oracle vs. Microsoft SQL, for example). Even if in theory this does not look like a big problem, in the day-to-day reality integration between two databases can become a nightmare. As the database structure differs from one provider to another, mapping is needed. This can be achieved either with internal IT staff or by buying services from vendors—both imply extra costs. It is preferable for enterprises to buy solutions from the same vendor. Even if these solutions are not perfectly integrated, at least they offer application program interfaces (APIs) and connectors that have been preconfigured to integrate between solutions.

Second, some niche solutions are offered on premise while others are offered in the cloud. Data residing in the cloud is not typically administered by the end user and thus cannot be accessed anytime, anywhere to perform stored procedures (a subroutine available to connected relational database system applications). End users usually require special permission from the vendor to perform any action on data stored in the cloud. In addition, upgrades of either on-premise or cloud solutions can lead to conflicts or rules being overridden. For instance, the API might fail to function as expected after an upgrade. Or permission to access certain functionality or data might be changed.


Download the full copy of the TEC 2013 CRM Buyer’s Guide for Medium and Large Enterprises.

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TEC 2014 HCM Buyer’s Guide for Medium and Large Enterprises


How do you treat humans as capital? The concept of human capital depends on its two parts: what we understand by “human” and what defines something as “capital.” The supporting technology then is a shape-giving agent to what human capital management (HCM) or human resources (HR) departments can become.

This buyer’s guide examines high-level features and functions offered by HCM technology vendors. It underlines the market tension between a tendency to consolidate various aspects of HCM technology into one suite and the best-of-breed approach to tackling HCM requirements. Additionally, it explores new niche-oriented technologies.

The product comparison included in this guide consists of information supplied by vendors of HCM solutions. The chart is intended to inform users about how vendors position themselves in the market as well as reveal some of their partner ecosystems. We acknowledge that there are many other vendors and products in the market, but we are able to include only a limited number in the product comparison chart.

This guide also includes discussions on how contemporary leadership models tackle global challenges, the prevalent perspective on workforce as talent versus “non-talent” and how businesses can shift toward a more fluent view of the workforce, and the new role of learning in realizing business goals.

Lastly, the buyer’s guide presents a range of real-life case studies that highlight client successes and thought leadership about relevant HCM issues and challenges, and the solutions vendors are offering to address them.

But most importantly, this guide invites us to imagine—beyond simple HCM/HR goals and accomplishments—an economy that continuously redefines the intersection of “human” and “capital.” Gabriel García Márquez recognized “that human beings are not born once and for all on the day their mothers give birth to them, but that life obliges them over and over again to give birth to themselves.”* We pay tribute to Márquez in these pages as a reminder that inspiration in our careers and business can come from any human endeavour—and this inspiration is ultimately what challenges the HCM technology market to stay vibrant.



Table of Contents


About this Guide

Preface

HCM for Medium and Large Enterprises

Full-Suite HCM versus Best-of-Breed Software Solutions

HCM Functionality

Niche Technologies


Product Comparison

TEC Resources

HCM in the 21st Century

Leadership Undone

More than “Talent”: Exploring Talent Management and Workforce Management as a Continuum

The Role of Enterprise Learning in a Company’s Growth


Casebook

Cezanne HR Customer Success Story: Casewise Improves Employee Communication with Cezanne OnDemand

Cornerstone OnDemand Customer Success Story: Diverse and Geographically Distributed Workforce

Cornerstone OnDemand White Paper: Increase Your Talent IQ: Stop Guessing and Start Making Smarter Decisions about Your Workforce

FinancialForce Human Capital Management (HCM) Customer Success Story: Workforce Management from Hire to Retire on the Salesforce1 Platform

IBM Customer Success Story: Dow Benelux Maintains a Happy Workplace

IBM White Paper: Human Capital Management in the 21st Century—Advancing Human Resources with Business Analytics

iCIMS Customer Success Story: iCIMS Helped ACCO Brands Streamline Recruiting During the Company’s International Expansion

Meta4 Customer Success Story
: Pepe Jeans: Harmonizing HR at the International Level

Oracle Customer Success Story
: Taleo Powers Growth via Talent Mobility at InterContinental Hotels Group

Thought Leadership sponsored by PeopleNext
: Why Invest in Talent Management? Five High-ROI Business Drivers for Implementing a Talent Management Program

Thought Leadership sponsored by SAP
: SAP’s Talent Journey—Reworking the Notions of Talent

Skillsoft Customer Success Story
: PGA of America—Professional Growth in a Multigenerational Workforce

Thought Leadership by SuccessFactors
: The Future of Attracting, Retaining, and Managing Talent: Keeping Up with Changes in the Workforce


Vendor Directory

About the Author


Download the full copy of the TEC 2014 ER HCM Buyer’s Guide for Medium and Large Enterprises.



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Full-suite HCM versus Best-of-breed Software Solutions



In human capital management (HCM), like in most other areas of enterprise software, buyers are often confused by the choice between a full suite and a best-of-breed solution. But, is this confusion a construct resulting from vendors positioning themselves as either conquerors or underdogs? The full suite is generally understood as consisting of core human resources (HR), talent management, and workforce management. Best-of-breed solutions typically offer functionality and service that focus on one of the three areas.

Buyers report that they hesitate between wanting to have all HCM software capabilities under a greater-scope solution—preferably their current enterprise resource planning (ERP) system—and an attractive, flexible, and deep best-of-breed HCM software option. However, the idea that a company can benefit only from one and must sacrifice the other may be erroneous. For example, software as a service (SaaS) appears to be a robust and reliable model for integrating best-of-breed solutions with larger systems.

In addition, competing vendors with modular software products propose offerings that are diverse—in their technology and product formulations, and also in their partnerships with other enterprise software vendors. Although to date vendors have not generally been going into a selection project with competing partners, this may be the case in the future, if the marketplace moves towards a more open market. For instance, on the same bid, one would be able to see a CSOD + ADP package and a CSOD + Workday package competing side by side.

So, a company does not have to be consumed by having to make a definitive choice on full suite versus best-of-breed HCM. Depending on the company’s culture, competing human resources (HR) priorities, and evolution, companies do not have to fear taking advantage of the core HR functionality present in their current ERP system when starting out. In most cases, there will later be the option of adding more systems to its portfolio of HCM software solutions, thanks to vendors presently being more open to the idea than in the past.

One of the major challenges when acquiring HCM enterprise software is to strike the right balance; companies often end up buying either more than they actually need or not enough. Buying more is seen as incurring unnecessary costs and risking low adoption. Yet providing less to buyers at the outset means requiring add-ons and third-party solutions to compensate for the insufficient initial offering—these imply costly and complicated integration by either in-house information technology (IT) personnel and/or vendors.


Download the full copy of the TEC 2014 ER HCM Buyer’s Guide for Medium and Large Enterprises.

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Performance Management-What the Mid-market Can Learn from Large Enterprises


Performance management allows companies to align business activity with corporate objectives. This research examines the different levels of business performance achieved by mid-market companies compared with larger firms, as well as the differences in strategy, capabilities, and technologies used. Key recommendations are drawn for mid-market businesses to increase the value they derive from performance management.

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Enterprises Must Look To Scale Mobility With a New Platform Approach


The intersection of mobile, social, analytics, and cloud technologies is transforming industry, commerce and human social behavior in an unprecedented way. For brands, this requires them to re-envision interactions with employees, partners and customers across business processes, and to rethink the IT services and methodologies they use to support these processes. Read this white paper to learn more about the specifics of how greater mobile maturity can benefit your company.

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Descartes Systems Group: Small Company With Large Ambition


In the increasingly competitive supply chain management marketplace, corporations either advance or are trodden underfoot. Descartes' acquisitions over the last few years demonstrate that its management is committed to establishing a dominant position in the Internet fulfillment and collaboration software market. In spite of recent losses, Descartes has the potential to pose serious competition for other vendors in the e-fulfillment market, such as SAP, i2, and Oracle. Success will depend primarily on Descartes ability to put its bold vision to work.

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Top 10 Reasons Enterprises Choose Veeam


This document from Veeam Software looks at decisions that need to be made in today’s modern data center and the potential of Veeam’s products to factor into these decisions. Key points to consider include recovery time and point objectives, and expense efficiency for data protection.

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Supply Chain Management Is Evolving toward Interdependent Supply Networks


Optimizing supply chain management processes to work more closely with trading partners, requires enterprises to act together as interdependent supply networks. The development of service oriented architecture will be crucial in achieving the necessary flexibility characterizing such networked supply chains.

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Four Supply Chain Issues Critical to the Success of Your Business


This has been as exciting a year in supply chain as any in recent memory. Enterprises are continuing to adjust to the still-uncertain economic picture, while supply chain management (SCM) vendors are coming out with new innovations such as analytics and predictive analytics, and leveraging other technologies such as the cloud and mobility to bring new functionality to their solutions. And as if

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Epicor for Service Enterprises: ERP for Services (Non-manufacturing) Competitor Analysis Report


The enterprise resource planning (ERP) for services knowledge base is appropriate for organizations in service-oriented industries. It consists of enterprise-wide integrated information systems that manage the operations, services, and resources of non-manufacturing organizations.

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