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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail
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 m part 14


Progress Software Revs Up to Higher RPM via Savvion - Part 1
Late 2009 and early 2010 were characterized by a number of mergers and acquisitions (M@As) in the vibrant and buoyant business process management (BPM

m part 14  Revs Up to Higher RPM via Savvion - Part 1 Late 2009 and early 2010 were characterized by a number of mergers and acquisitions (M&As) in the vibrant and buoyant  business process management (BPM)  space.  The merger of Progress Software Corp. (NASDAQ: PRGS) and Savvion Inc. drew my attention  in particular. Why? Because, to my mind, Progress has thus made a large leap into the BPM space, a market where it has been notably absent. Namely, from Progress’ analyst event two years ago, I vividly

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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail

We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.

Get free sample report
Compare Software Solutions

Visit the TEC store to compare leading software by functionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.

Compare Now

Software Test Tools

Tools exist to support software testing at all stages of a project. Some vendors offer an integrated suite that will support testing and development throughout a project's life, from gathering requirements to supporting the live system. Some vendors concentrate on a single part of that life cycle. The software test tools knowledge base provides functional criteria you might expect from a testing tool, the infrastructure that supports the tool, and an idea of the market position of the vendor.  

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Documents related to » m part 14

The Wizardry of Business Process Management - Part 1


The business process management (BPM) market is sizzling hot, with Gartner Dataquest estimating its compound annual growth rate (CAGR) at 13 percent in 2009. In fact, almost all leading BPM vendors have been buzzing about their unprecedented growth and profitability, especially amidst the ongoing economic drought. It is truly difficult to argue against the need for companies from all walks of

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Federal Contract Management and Vendors' Readiness Part Three: Meeting Federal Requirements


Companies that are not already offering the capabilities of meeting the exacting, stringent requirements of federal agencies will likely not be able to tap the recent surge in the federal and defense markets. Conversely, those vendors and their users--government contractors--who can deliver comprehensive solutions that satisfy the requirements of federal agencies are in the driver's seat to capture that market segment.

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Federal Procurement Essentials: Sealed Bidding


Selling to the government can bring new life to contract winners, particularly small and medium businesses. In fact, organizations that understand and leverage federal acquisition methods and processes can grow from scratch to a profitable bottom line, whatever their size.

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Resurrection, Vitality And Perseverance Of Former ERP 'Goners' Part Two: Geac & Baan


While not doing as well as Ross and SSA GT, Geac and Baan are certainly on the right track.

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Dreamforce 2010: Of Cloud Proliferation - Part 2


Part 1 of this blog series talked about my attendance of Dreamforce 2010, salesforce.com’s annual user conference, which has over the past several years become a highly anticipated and entertaining end-of-the-year fixture for enterprise applications market observers. My post concluded that while Dreamforce 2009 was mostly about continued growth of the cloud computing

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Frankie Does ERP, Part 3


[Editor’s note: Frank is a real person, employed at a real company. However, I’ve changed certain identifying particulars for a variety of reasons. This interactive series is an exercise in what-if analysis based on ongoing interviews with Frankie as well as your feedback. You may find Frank’s use of language a little colorful. I have toned it down. It’s still colorful.] Previously

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The 11th Vendor Shootout for ERP: Observations - Part 2


Part 1 of this blog series talked about my attendance of the 11th Vendor ShootoutTM for ERP event, which took place in Boston in mid-August 2011. I was able to experience this co-opetitive gathering of eight solution providers and several dozen end users seeking new solutions first-hand as a neutral (and yet very active) observer (for the inner workings of the event, see my article Demystifying

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Taking Stock of TAKE Supply Chain Solutions - Part 3


Part 1 of this blog series introduced TAKE Supply Chain, a supply chain management (SCM) division of TAKE Solutions, Ltd. The parent TAKE Solutions is a global technology solutions and service provider, which focuses on two principal business areas – life sciences and SCM (the company is listed on the Indian Stock Exchange). My first post described TAKE Supply Chain’s

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It's the Aftermarket Service, Stupid! (Part II)


Part I of this blog topic introduced MCA Solutions and its flagship Service Planning Optimization (SPO) solution for planning and optimizing spare parts [evaluate this product]. That blog post also tackled MCA's notably good times during 2007. In the meantime, an informative post on MCA was also published by the Sourcing Innovation blog. A related 2007 milestone at MCA included a significant

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Can We Intelligently Use Part Numbers to Configure and Order the Right Products?


In the industrial automation industry, an overlooked, fatal flaw of sales configurator solutions is their inability to simultaneously configure part numbers and products. A greater concern is their inability to "decipher" product specifications from part numbers—that is, in reverse.

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