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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail
We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.
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 maps earth


What's Really Driving Business Intelligence?
Typical explanations given for increased spending in business intelligence include, meeting government regulations, managing information overload, tracking

maps earth  balanced scorecard, called Strategy Maps , gives a decent overview of the process of reducing corporate strategy to supporting business processes and their underlying intangibles. It's heady stuff, but if you want to understand what's really driving the BI trend, you need to move beyond information into real knowledge. About the Author Christopher Kenton is president of Cymbic, a San Francisco (US) marketing agency and consulting firm specializing in marketing management for technology companies. He is a

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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail

We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.

Get free sample report
Compare Software Solutions

Visit the TEC store to compare leading software by functionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.

Compare Now

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Demystifying SAP Solution Manager


Many large organizations are struggling to manage all their software systems—let alone the different software versions across departments. In his article, TEC principal analyst P.J. Jakovljevic discusses how SAP Solution Manager, a unique offering for centralized support and system management, covers all aspects of system deployment, operations, and continuous improvement, to ease customer pain with their complex IT environment.

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A Semi-open Source Vendor Discusses Market Trends


A response to trends in the open source software market comes this time from relative newcomer provider xTuple. This vendor’s footprint isn’t entirely in the open source door, however, with OpenMFG, its commercially licensed solution with an open source infrastructure.

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QAD Explore 2012: Only Good Things Can Come from Talking to the Customer


As a seasoned provider of enterprise applications for manufacturing companies, QAD knows the importance of listening to its clients. In fact, the company has created a customer engagement program to help its customers align their business processes to their strategic business goals. Get the details on this program, as well as a full update from the QAD Explore 2012 user conference in P.J. Jakovljevic’s latest article.

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Two Stalwart Vendors Discuss Market Trends


In this unique question and answer series, vendors were given the opportunity to put forth their views on market trends, platform approaches, and mid-market issues. The questions posed to willing participants of this opinion poll are elaborated on here.

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Bad Customer Support Is Not a Software Problem


A couple of days ago, my laptop decided (all on its own) to jump off my desk. Lucky for me, it survived almost completely undamaged except for a broken latch, which seemed easy enough to fix. So I decided to order the replacement part and fix it myself. Since I didn’t know exactly what part I needed to order, I started by calling the vendor’s Technical Service number. I

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JDA FOCUS 2010 Impressions - Part 2


Part 1 of this blog series talked about my attendance of the JDA FOCUS 2010 conference on the heels of the recent merger between JDA Software (NASDAQ: JDAS) and i2 Technologies. The article first discussed the different geneses and cultures of the two merging parties. One major outcome of the conference was JDA’s unveiled plan to converge most of its existing and acquired

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BI Principles for Another Kind of Intelligence


Traditional business intelligence (BI) and analytics applications aim to support the decision-making process of a company. By analyzing large amounts of data, most BI applications provide the means for making business-oriented decisions. This includes studying the data from the perspective of improving the business and generating more business. Most intelligence applications follow

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Mining & Quarrying


Mining is the extraction from the earth of materials used in different human activities (industry, trade, energy production, etc.). There are four major types of materials: precious metals and minerals (gold, diamonds, silver, etc.); materials used to produce energy (coal, uranium, etc.); base metals (copper, iron, etc.); and building materials (stone, sand, gravel) extracted from quarries, which are open-pit mines. There are two major types of activities specific to the mining industry: exploration, which involves the search for materials; and extraction, which is the activity of getting those materials out of the earth.

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BI State of the Market Report


IT departments rarely know as much about a business as the business people themselves. But business people rarely take action on numbers alone: they share the information with others, soliciting their feedback and performing external research before taking action. Business users still depend on IT to deliver answers related to the information that they receive. Business intelligence (BI) 2.0—also known as collaborative BI—uses the collective intelligence of the user community to enrich existing information. Learn how business intelligence (BI) 2.0 is helping business users create and modify their own reports, share and enrich information, and provide feedback to each other and to information producers.

When the community helps itself, information is turned into actionable information more quickly than when using purely “traditional” methods of community support, such as meetings, phone calls, and e-mail. And when actions are taken more quickly, the entire organization becomes more nimble and ultimately more competitive. This overview discusses how BI 2.0 can provide real benefits within your organization and what product features to look for in a BI solution in order to realize those benefits.

We hope you’ll find this guide a useful tool in determining which BI solution is best suited to your company’s business model and particular needs.


Table of Contents


Executive Overview
Using BI 2.0 to Increase your Competitive Advantage

Case Study
LogiXML Helps to Power its Real-Estate Reporting and Analysis

Thought Leadership
How Smart Marketers Succeed Online

Market Insight
Mashups and Pervasive BI

Report Sponsors
LogiXML

IBM

About TEC



Download the full copy of the TEC 2009 BI Buyer’s Guide for businesses.



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Using BI 2.0 to Increase Your Competitive Advantage


Business users know their data better than IT does. They know the meaning of the data, its history, and its relationship with other data. Yet traditional BI solutions have business users referring to IT for assistance with their data. Also, they are forced to work in silos. Sure, they can create their own reports and maybe even share them with other business users, but when it comes to sharing their own knowledge about the data, they have to rely on e-mail, telephone, and face-to-face meetings. By enabling the sharing of data-related knowledge through the BI system itself, business users become more self-sufficient and actions can be taken more quickly.

The raison d’être of BI is to provide business users with information that enables them to take action. Even if business users are self-sufficient when it comes to creating and sharing data, data on its own is rarely sufficient to take action. Identifying an opportunity in the market through numbers alone is not sufficient to justify investment in a new product or geography. Identifying a bottleneck in a business process is not sufficient to justify changes in the business process. Information about a business issue or opportunity is merely a part of the overall “solution domain.” Action is usually only taken after considering a number of factors in addition to the data, such as human knowledge and experience, the economic environment, and the competitive environment.

In this section, we lay out the capabilities to look for in a BI solution—and specific functional requirements needed to support these capabilities—that contribute to the goal of “harnessing collective intelligence.” In general, the more recent entrants into the BI market are paying the most attention to BI 2.0. Some vendors, such as Good Data, have it as a central component of their solution offerings.

The following are key capabilities of BI 2.0:

  • Collaboration
    Business users are able to share information within the user community and create discussion threads relating to the information.


  • Identification of useful information
    Business users can flag information that is likely to be of use to others within the community.


  • Enriching of Information
    Business users can enrich the information through their knowledge and experience in addition to other external information sources in order to explain trends and generally assist other consumers of that information.


The community of “business users” needn’t be restricted to internal users. User collaboration is already mature within the Web space, under the guise of Web 2.0. With Web 2.0, collective intelligence is harnessed through comments on blog posts; contributions to wikis such as Wikipedia; and tagging of content, such as photos on Flickr. BI 2.0 takes these methods and applies them in the BI space by making data the focus of user collaboration.

The following sections take the capabilities above and list the functional requirements that support them. Bear in mind that each of these functional requirements is a business user requirement and not an IT or development requirement.


Download the full copy of the TEC 2009 BI Buyer’s Guide for businesses.

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Siebel Rallies Its Integration Alliance Troops Part 1: Recent Announcements


Siebel is finally taking 'the bull by the horns' by acknowledging the integration challenges its customers face, and by addressing that issue. An often troubling aspect of CRM implementations in the past is that the only way IT departments can achieve a full view of the customer is by integrating front-end, customer facing applications (e.g., contact management) with back-office systems, such as billing applications and financial ERP modules.

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