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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail
We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.
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Compare Software Solutions
Visit the TEC store to compare leading software solutions by funtionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.
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 market research survey examples


State of the Market: HR
More than ever, executives are looking to transform human resources (HR) from a seemingly low-priority function into a strategic part of the business. This

market research survey examples  are available on the market today. Whether you decide to lease or purchase HR software, or if outsourcing your HR processes is the way you choose to go, there are hurdles you must clear. SMBs will overcome these challenges in time by becoming more familiar with the available software and its processes. Whichever route you take, your choice must be cost-effective, efficient, dependable, and most importantly, meet your needs and be in line with your HR initiatives. About The Author Sherry Fox is a TEC

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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail

We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.

Get free sample report
Compare Software Solutions

Visit the TEC store to compare leading software by functionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.

Compare Now

Enterprise Marketing Management (EMM)

The Enterprise Marketing Management (EMM) Knowledge Base research helps determine support levels of various systems that help companies market their services or products effectively and efficiently. EMM tools help manage strategic planning and marketing resources (sometimes referred to as marketing resource management or MRM). This KB also covers rule-based techniques, pattern recognition, and other profiling features.  

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Growing Food and Beverage Businesses: Innovation to Maximize Market Opportunities


Global demand for food and beverages continues to rise, and the market will pay a premium for partially prepared healthier choices. Food and beverage manufacturers with innovative solutions for these niche markets are in a position to gain brand dominance, resulting in higher revenues, profits, and market share. Discover tactical and strategic innovative practices that can help support changes in your business processes.

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Forget Speeds and Feeds-ERP Outsourcing for the Mid-market


If you base your selection of an outsourcing partner on a service provider’s strengths, it can be difficult to make an apples-to-apples comparison among the various models. The best way to make a comparison in a thoughtful and effective manner is to develop individual specifications matching buyer needs with service provider strengths in order to make an enduring match. Find out how.

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Recession? Steal Market Share by Increasing Customer Service!


During a recession, don’t follow the cost-cutting crowd. Of course, be frugal, but in areas that don’t touch the customer. Forget what everyone else is doing. Now isn’t the time to follow the masses—now is the time to make difficult decisions that will poise your company for unprecedented growth coming out of the downturn. Find out how to think and act for the long term—and emerge from the current economic stall a winner.

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BI State of the Market Report


IT departments rarely know as much about a business as the business people themselves. But business people rarely take action on numbers alone: they share the information with others, soliciting their feedback and performing external research before taking action. Business users still depend on IT to deliver answers related to the information that they receive. Business intelligence (BI) 2.0—also known as collaborative BI—uses the collective intelligence of the user community to enrich existing information. Learn how business intelligence (BI) 2.0 is helping business users create and modify their own reports, share and enrich information, and provide feedback to each other and to information producers.

When the community helps itself, information is turned into actionable information more quickly than when using purely “traditional” methods of community support, such as meetings, phone calls, and e-mail. And when actions are taken more quickly, the entire organization becomes more nimble and ultimately more competitive. This overview discusses how BI 2.0 can provide real benefits within your organization and what product features to look for in a BI solution in order to realize those benefits.

We hope you’ll find this guide a useful tool in determining which BI solution is best suited to your company’s business model and particular needs.


Table of Contents


Executive Overview
Using BI 2.0 to Increase your Competitive Advantage

Case Study
LogiXML Helps to Power its Real-Estate Reporting and Analysis

Thought Leadership
How Smart Marketers Succeed Online

Market Insight
Mashups and Pervasive BI

Report Sponsors
LogiXML

IBM

About TEC



Download the full copy of the TEC 2009 BI Buyer’s Guide for businesses.



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Using BI 2.0 to Increase Your Competitive Advantage


Business users know their data better than IT does. They know the meaning of the data, its history, and its relationship with other data. Yet traditional BI solutions have business users referring to IT for assistance with their data. Also, they are forced to work in silos. Sure, they can create their own reports and maybe even share them with other business users, but when it comes to sharing their own knowledge about the data, they have to rely on e-mail, telephone, and face-to-face meetings. By enabling the sharing of data-related knowledge through the BI system itself, business users become more self-sufficient and actions can be taken more quickly.

The raison d’être of BI is to provide business users with information that enables them to take action. Even if business users are self-sufficient when it comes to creating and sharing data, data on its own is rarely sufficient to take action. Identifying an opportunity in the market through numbers alone is not sufficient to justify investment in a new product or geography. Identifying a bottleneck in a business process is not sufficient to justify changes in the business process. Information about a business issue or opportunity is merely a part of the overall “solution domain.” Action is usually only taken after considering a number of factors in addition to the data, such as human knowledge and experience, the economic environment, and the competitive environment.

In this section, we lay out the capabilities to look for in a BI solution—and specific functional requirements needed to support these capabilities—that contribute to the goal of “harnessing collective intelligence.” In general, the more recent entrants into the BI market are paying the most attention to BI 2.0. Some vendors, such as Good Data, have it as a central component of their solution offerings.

The following are key capabilities of BI 2.0:

  • Collaboration
    Business users are able to share information within the user community and create discussion threads relating to the information.


  • Identification of useful information
    Business users can flag information that is likely to be of use to others within the community.


  • Enriching of Information
    Business users can enrich the information through their knowledge and experience in addition to other external information sources in order to explain trends and generally assist other consumers of that information.


The community of “business users” needn’t be restricted to internal users. User collaboration is already mature within the Web space, under the guise of Web 2.0. With Web 2.0, collective intelligence is harnessed through comments on blog posts; contributions to wikis such as Wikipedia; and tagging of content, such as photos on Flickr. BI 2.0 takes these methods and applies them in the BI space by making data the focus of user collaboration.

The following sections take the capabilities above and list the functional requirements that support them. Bear in mind that each of these functional requirements is a business user requirement and not an IT or development requirement.


Download the full copy of the TEC 2009 BI Buyer’s Guide for businesses.

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TEC Launches New Website Featuring Improvements in Functionality and Ease of Use for Online Software Research and Evaluation


TEC has launched its newly re-designed website at www.technologyevaluation.com. With one of the largest free online software research libraries and sets of software comparison tools, TEC’s re-designed website will better assist companies researching and selecting enterprise software solutions.

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Symantec 2011 SMB Disaster Preparedness Survey Report


Discover how to protect your company in the Symantec 2011 SMB Disaster Preparedness Survey Report.

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Hypatia Research


Industry analyst and market research firm Hypatia Research Group provides market intelligence, industry benchmarking, best practice, maturity model, and vendor selection research for how businesses use software technology, professional services, and management consulting providers to capture, manage, analyze, and apply customer and market intelligence to enhance corporate performance and to accelerate growth.

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HRM Research Analyst Job Opportunity


We’re seeking an additional HR software-focused research analyst to join our team at our Montreal headquarters. Please contact us if the following job description interests you. TEC seeks a research analyst and consultant for enterprise software subjects such as human resource management (HRM), compensation, performance, and incentive management, and finance. Candidates must apply

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TEC Research Analyst Roundtable: Predictions for 2011


It’s that time of year again for TEC’s analysts to polish their crystal balls and spread their tarot cards to gaze on the future of enterprise software for 2011.Aleksey Osintsev, Research Analyst—Enterprise Resource Planning The growing interest of businesses of all sizes in so-called cloud technologies in general and in on-demand—cloud or software as a service (SaaS)—enterprise

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Password Management Survey: The Impact of Password Policies


While the growing trend among companies today is to implement stronger password policies to increase network security, it seems that many still struggle with finding the most cost-effective solution. Read about what a recent survey of over 600 IT professionals discovered about password policies, and find out why implementing a low-risk, cost-effective, and secure password management solution is just what you need.

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