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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail
We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.
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Visit the TEC store to compare leading software solutions by funtionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.
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 nanotechnology dna


Barcoding 101 for Manufacturers: What You Need to Know to Get Started
For manufacturers, barcoding carries with it numerous benefits, including increased accuracy, efficiency, and traceability, along with easier adherence to

nanotechnology dna  101 for Manufacturers: What You Need to Know to Get Started Plex Online specializes in implementing bar coding systems that track containers and/or individual parts on the factory floor using hand-held Pocket PCs. Containers or parts are scanned as they move around the shop floor, providing a highly accurate, real-time inventory system. Source: Plex Systems Resources Related to Barcoding 101 for Manufacturers: What You Need to Know to Get Started : Barcode (Wikipedia) Barcoding 101 for

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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail

We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.

Get free sample report
Compare Software Solutions

Visit the TEC store to compare leading software by functionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.

Compare Now

Documents related to » nanotechnology dna

Salesforce.com Wants to Help You Transition to a Customer Company


Coincidentally or not, my industry analyst career started at about the same time that salesforce.com was founded, back in 1999. And boy, has the vocal cloud software company had an amazing transition over the years—once dismissed as a fad-like niche sales force automation (SFA) vendor with glorified contact management capabilities, salesforce.com is now a $3 billion (USD) enterprise software

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Application Portfolio Management: Are You Getting the Most from your Enterprise Software?


Information technology organizations are faced with the challenge of managing a host of diverse enterprise applications, and the need to evaluate application metrics and performance. To address this challenge, it is worth considering application portfolio management solutions.

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The Wizardry of Business Process Management - Part 4


Part 1 of this blog series started a lengthy discussion about the value proposition and parts-and-parcels of business process management (BPM), with an ensuing focus on Pegasystems (also known as Pega) as one of the leading BPM suite providers. Part 2 then analyzed in depth the vendor’s ability to help business users capture (and then realize) business objectives and intent, while Part 3 focused

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Not Just Words: Enforce Your E-mail and Web Acceptable Usage Policies


Unmanaged employee use of e-mail and the Web can subject your organization to costly risks including litigation, regulatory investigations, and public embarrassment. Responsible organizations should deploy clearly written acceptable usage policies (AUPs) for e-mail and Web usage, supported by employee training and enforced by technology solutions. Find out how to develop and enforce e-mail and Web AUPs in your workplace.

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What’s New in Microsoft SQL Server 2000


SQL Server 2000, the next major release of SQL Server 7, is Microsoft’s SQL 7 release of its database both re-architected and re-written. Microsoft has high hopes for the latest version in a market that was worth $8 Billion in 1999, an 18% increase over 1998. What remains to be seen is whether it will attract customers not already using SQL Server.

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Will 2013 Be IBS’ Comeback Year? Part 2


In part 1 of this series, we took a look at IBS, some of the challenges the company was facing, and its software offerings for the business community. To discuss the aforementioned issues (see part 1) and IBS’ ongoing turnaround, we recently spoke to Doug Braun, the chief executive officer (CEO) of IBS. As CEO, Mr. Braun is responsible for translating business needs into products that solve

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The Tricky Enterprise Applications Needs of Plastics Producers


General enterprise resource planning (ERP) providers, even those which are viable companies with a solid product, typically do not meet the tricky requirements that are vital to the plastics industry and related so-called mill or material converter businesses.

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Business Process Simulation Technology from Lanner


Today, TEC Research Analyst Gabriel Gheorghiu focuses on business process simulation software provider Lanner Group. Gabriel looks at Lanner's history, products, and market position—and explains the pros and cons of using software to simulate your business processes.

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SaaS Buyer's Guide for Wholesale and Distribution


SaaS, despite its phenomenal popularity, is certainly not one-size-fits-all. You need to consider decision criteria such as fit, return on investment, and risk. Learn how SaaS works, who the major vendors are, how SaaS can help your business grow, and how to find the SaaS solution that’s right for you. It’s all in this comprehensive SaaS Buyer’s Guide for Wholesale and Distribution from TEC and SupplyChainBrain.

From a business requirements perspective, the defining characteristic of wholesale and distribution (W&D) organizations is that they operate as intermediate agents between manufacturers and retailers. Their top business needs thus focus on requirements for:

  • processing high volumes of transactions,
  • maintaining constant communication between upstream and downstream collaborators (manufacturers and retailers/customers, respectively), and
  • managing products for multiple competitors within the same warehouse or distribution center

In this guide we will explore considerations for W&D organizations that are considering adoption of the SaaS delivery model, and examine the particular business issues that arise from this change.Specifically, we will address the following considerations:

  • the differences between SaaS and on-premise delivery models
  • SaaS architectures
  • SaaS pros, cons, and other considerations
  • selection criteria for SaaS-based applications
  • viable wholesale and distribution SaaS vendors

Later in this guide, we’ll provide examples of SaaS delivery model success stories, as well as a SaaS IT directory, segmented according to business area.


Table of Contents


Preface

Software as a Service: A Buyer’s Guide


Spotlight on Adaptability and Agility

Thought Leadership from SAP
SAP’s Perspective on Software as a Service

SAP Case Study
Johnson Products Capitalizing on New Sales after 30-day SAP Deployment


Spotlight on Manufacturing and Distribution

Thought Leadership from Epicor
SaaS ERP for Small Manufacturers and Distributors

TECSYS Case Study
LifeScience Logistics Achieves 99.97% Inventory Accuracy with TECYS’ EliteSeries for Healthcare


Spotlight on Growing Your Company with SaaS

Thought Leadership from NetSuite
The Benefits of a Business Management Software Suite for High-growth and Midsized Businesses: Overcoming the Barriers of Stand-alone Business Applications

NetSuite Case Study
Woodworking Machinery Maker Cuts Costs, Grows Efficiency with NetSuite

NetSuite Case Study
NetSuite Helps Manufacturer Take Advantage of Fast Market Growth


Spotlight on Distribution Centers

Thought Leadership from Bond International Software
Cloud Computing for Your Distribution Workforce

IBS Case Study
Konaflex Focuses on its Core Business with IBS Distribution Management Software


Vendor Directory


Download the full copy of the TEC 2010 SaaS Buyer’s Guide for wholesale and distribution.



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What Are the Differences between the SaaS and On-premise Delivery Models?



Defining the on-premise delivery model is relatively straightforward:

  • The software is acquired by the customer up-front.
  • The software is installed, deployed, managed, and maintained at the customer’s site, generally with a great degree of involvement by the customer.
  • The customer provides the in-house infrastructure (e.g., servers, hardware, networks) to support the software.


Defining the SaaS model is slightly more complex, since different SaaS vendors offer different definitions. We’ll explore these variations in more detail shortly, but for now we’ll note the following SaaS characteristics:

  • The software vendor provides customers with access to the software via the Internet.
  • The customer pays for this service on a subscription basis (normally per user, per month, or per number of transactions).
  • The vendor is responsible for maintenance, upgrades, and software support, as well as the supporting infrastructure.

The major difference between the on-premise and SaaS delivery model lies in the ownership of the software. In the on-premise model, once the software is purchased, the customer owns it. In the SaaS delivery model, the software is not owned by the customer: it is provided to the customer in the same manner as any other service.


Download the full copy of the TEC 2010 SaaS Buyer’s Guide for wholesale and distribution.

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Coupa 10 Heralds Sourcing for the Masses


Coupa Software, a provider of cloud-based spend optimization solutions for finance, recently announced the release of Coupa 10. The new release features an entirely new sourcing application designed to bring sourcing to the masses by intelligently guiding users to select the best sourcing opportunities to save money based on real-time analysis of their current spend. It further enhances the

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