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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail
We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.
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 the decision making process dss


The Complex Handling of Complexity in Decision Support Systems
Warren Weaver, an American mathematician known for his work on machine translation and his support for science in the United States, defined the complexity of a

the decision making process dss  most reliable data. Sometimes the decision process does not depend on data volumes but certainly on data that is accurate, consistent, and reliable enough to represent at least a sample of the truth. Consider a set of data that guarantees accuracy, timing, and consistency. The Act: When making a decision support process, it’s necessary to consider having a formal process to conduct it. There are some new approaches that rely on strictly formal processes to address decision-making issues like

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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail

We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.

Get free sample report
Compare Software Solutions

Visit the TEC store to compare leading software by functionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.

Compare Now

Core PLM for Process Industries Software Evaluation Report

Core PLM, Product Specification and Recipe Management (PDM and RM) for Process Industries covers the base foundation of PLM for the process (or recipe-based) manufacturing industries such as food & beverage, chemical, pharmaceutical and others. It covers design and product-related aspects of PLM including management of material specifications, recipes, formulas, production processes, design tools, document management and collaboration. 

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BI State of the Market Report


IT departments rarely know as much about a business as the business people themselves. But business people rarely take action on numbers alone: they share the information with others, soliciting their feedback and performing external research before taking action. Business users still depend on IT to deliver answers related to the information that they receive. Business intelligence (BI) 2.0—also known as collaborative BI—uses the collective intelligence of the user community to enrich existing information. Learn how business intelligence (BI) 2.0 is helping business users create and modify their own reports, share and enrich information, and provide feedback to each other and to information producers.

When the community helps itself, information is turned into actionable information more quickly than when using purely “traditional” methods of community support, such as meetings, phone calls, and e-mail. And when actions are taken more quickly, the entire organization becomes more nimble and ultimately more competitive. This overview discusses how BI 2.0 can provide real benefits within your organization and what product features to look for in a BI solution in order to realize those benefits.

We hope you’ll find this guide a useful tool in determining which BI solution is best suited to your company’s business model and particular needs.


Table of Contents


Executive Overview
Using BI 2.0 to Increase your Competitive Advantage

Case Study
LogiXML Helps to Power its Real-Estate Reporting and Analysis

Thought Leadership
How Smart Marketers Succeed Online

Market Insight
Mashups and Pervasive BI

Report Sponsors
LogiXML

IBM

About TEC



Download the full copy of the TEC 2009 BI Buyer’s Guide for businesses.



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Using BI 2.0 to Increase Your Competitive Advantage


Business users know their data better than IT does. They know the meaning of the data, its history, and its relationship with other data. Yet traditional BI solutions have business users referring to IT for assistance with their data. Also, they are forced to work in silos. Sure, they can create their own reports and maybe even share them with other business users, but when it comes to sharing their own knowledge about the data, they have to rely on e-mail, telephone, and face-to-face meetings. By enabling the sharing of data-related knowledge through the BI system itself, business users become more self-sufficient and actions can be taken more quickly.

The raison d’être of BI is to provide business users with information that enables them to take action. Even if business users are self-sufficient when it comes to creating and sharing data, data on its own is rarely sufficient to take action. Identifying an opportunity in the market through numbers alone is not sufficient to justify investment in a new product or geography. Identifying a bottleneck in a business process is not sufficient to justify changes in the business process. Information about a business issue or opportunity is merely a part of the overall “solution domain.” Action is usually only taken after considering a number of factors in addition to the data, such as human knowledge and experience, the economic environment, and the competitive environment.

In this section, we lay out the capabilities to look for in a BI solution—and specific functional requirements needed to support these capabilities—that contribute to the goal of “harnessing collective intelligence.” In general, the more recent entrants into the BI market are paying the most attention to BI 2.0. Some vendors, such as Good Data, have it as a central component of their solution offerings.

The following are key capabilities of BI 2.0:

  • Collaboration
    Business users are able to share information within the user community and create discussion threads relating to the information.


  • Identification of useful information
    Business users can flag information that is likely to be of use to others within the community.


  • Enriching of Information
    Business users can enrich the information through their knowledge and experience in addition to other external information sources in order to explain trends and generally assist other consumers of that information.


The community of “business users” needn’t be restricted to internal users. User collaboration is already mature within the Web space, under the guise of Web 2.0. With Web 2.0, collective intelligence is harnessed through comments on blog posts; contributions to wikis such as Wikipedia; and tagging of content, such as photos on Flickr. BI 2.0 takes these methods and applies them in the BI space by making data the focus of user collaboration.

The following sections take the capabilities above and list the functional requirements that support them. Bear in mind that each of these functional requirements is a business user requirement and not an IT or development requirement.


Download the full copy of the TEC 2009 BI Buyer’s Guide for businesses.

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Business Intelligence: Actionable Insights for Business Decision Makers


Despite significant investments in data collection and integration, few companies can redeploy accumulated data to drive business performance. To succeed, they need new business intelligence (BI) tools that can integrate and analyze huge amounts of internal and external data. Learn how such tools can help your company understand customer needs, identify trends, and use the resulting lead time to seize opportunities.

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Compare Leading CRM Software or Process ERP Solutions -- in 10 Minutes or Less


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3 DSS Myths Exploded


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i2 Technologies at the Front of the Supply Chain


i2 Technologies is the largest and fastest growing vendor of supply chain management software with $456 million in revenue over the last twelve months and a 48% average growth rate over the last five years. Fueled by a powerful sales and marketing machine and corporate development strategy, i2 will maintain its lead through Y2K and beyond.

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The Critical Role of the Enterprise Product Catalog: Cost, Time-to-market, and the Customer Experience


Many companies now combine services in pre-packaged, high-value bundles to reduce customer churn rates. And these bundled services have proved to bring returns. But they also bring complexity—some major service providers may have over 150 product catalogs. Get tips on how to overcome the problems of bundling, and avoid catalog duplication in your product or service offering, with product information management (PIM).

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Sage’s New Year's Resolution: Make 2013 The Year of the Customer


2012 was a whirlwind year of influences on the business landscape—some of them good and some of them not so good. The fiscal cliff, the U.S. presidential election, an anemic economic recovery, the debt ceiling and proposed sequestration cuts, along with Hurricane Sandy’s effects on business are a few things that come to mind. But despite the ever-changing business landscape, one central tenet

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Product Life Cycle Management (PLM) in Process Part 2 Process PLM Motivation


This part of the series on Product Life Cycle Management in Process explores the business motivations by review business strategies.

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The Undocumented Layers of the OSI Model and Their Impact on Security


The biggest threat to data security doesn’t come from hackers, misconfigured firewalls, missing patches, or negligent employees. Nor is it in the application layer of the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) Basic Model. Instead, there are three undocumented layers of the OSI Model that exert a huge influence on security decisions and the integrity of security programs. Learn about those layers and how to manage the threat.

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The Versatile Group, Inc.


Founded in 1992, the Versatile Group is a privately held corporation headquartered in Dallas, Texas (US). The company provides business accounting software products that leverage proven technologies. Its customers represent a wide spectrum of business and industries.

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