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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail
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 xtuple


xTuple
xTuple provides free, and commercially licensed, open source enterprise resource planning (ERP) software. Its customers range from small businesses to large

xtuple  xTuple provides free, and commercially licensed, open source enterprise resource planning (ERP) software. Its customers range from small businesses to large enterprises in a variety of industries, including food production, manufacturing of pistons, industrial pumps, and specialty garments, and others. xTuple is headquartered in Norfolk, Virginia (US).

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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail

We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.

Get free sample report
Compare Software Solutions

Visit the TEC store to compare leading software by functionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.

Compare Now

Documents related to » xtuple

xTuple xChange, Add on to Your ERP


In a call yesterday with xTuple's Ned Lilly, we had a chance to catch up on the open source ERP vendor's current business. I wanted to say a word about the company's recently launched xChange online store, which I think is a smart way for an open source enterprise software vendor to provide clients convenient access to community and partner innovations. It may also be a cost-effective means for

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xTuple Tackles E-commerce in Earnest


xTuple, a provider of open source enterprise resource planning (ERP) software solutions, recently announced the availability of xTupleCommerce—version 2.0 of its e-commerce Web portal. The vendor also acquired a notable Web consultancy partner, Artsmith Media, to support booming customer demand for the online business/commerce solution.

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What’s Up with xTuple-and Open Source ERP?


You may be wondering how the open-source ERP vendor xTuple operating with a workforce of only 27 can compete on the same stage with the software giants. Find out how as TEC principal analyst P.J. Jakovljevic looks at xTuple’s current ERP offerings and commercial editions, and speaks with xTuple CEO Ned Lilly on the vendor’s social capabilities, product development focus, market and competitive landscape, and future outlook.

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xTuple ERP


The xTuple enterprise resource planning (ERP) software is available in three editions. The open-source PostBooks Edition contains functionality for basic accounting, including general ledger (GL), accounts receivable (AR), and accounts payable (AP). It also includes fully integrated customer relationship management (CRM) functionality, as well as functionality for sales, purchasing, product definition, inventory, light manufacturing, and reporting. The commercially licensed Standard Edition contains everything in the open source PostBooks Edition, plus additional enterprise-class functionality specifically for distributors and light manufacturers, such as advanced returns management, batch processing of e-mailed documents, multiwarehouse control, lot/serial tracking and tracing, and other features. The commercially licensed Manufacturing Edition of xTuple ERP contains everything in the PostBooks and Standard Editions, plus additional enterprise-class functionality specifically for manufacturers. All three editions use the same client software—only the database is different. All application business logic resides in the database, and all three editions are based on the same core code. Users can upgrade from PostBooks to the Standard or Manufacturing Edition by running a simple script on their databases.  

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A Semi-open Source Vendor Discusses Market Trends


A response to trends in the open source software market comes this time from relative newcomer provider xTuple. This vendor’s footprint isn’t entirely in the open source door, however, with OpenMFG, its commercially licensed solution with an open source infrastructure.

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The (NA)Vision of Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2009 - Part 3


Part 1 and Part 2 of this blog series went through the five previous generations of the Microsoft Dynamics NAV (formerly Navision) product. In late 2008, at the European Microsoft Convergence user conference, attendees saw the sixth major release of the product, dubbed Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2009. The product’s subsequent launch in the US was in February 2009 (the replay can be seen here). But

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Consona’s CEO Clearing the Air (about Compiere) - Part 1


In early June Consona Corporation’s analyst relationship (AR) contact forewarned me about the company’s upcoming acquisition of a “leading open-source and cloud computing enterprise resource planning (ERP) vendor” and asked about my availability for a briefing once the acquisition was closed. After consultation with TEC’s free and open source software (FOSS) buff Josh

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Zoho’s Mod Appeal


If you are a small or medium business and you haven’t heard of Zoho yet, you should check it out—the company might have an app for you, perhaps even for free. The name alludes to small office, home office, i.e., SOHO, although some products are suited to larger companies. The Web-based mini apps of the Zoho Office Suite are a great example of the trend of the atomization of user experience

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Do You Want Your Apps to Talk Back to You (as a Chatterbox)? - Part 1


Let me start this blog series with one disclaimer: I am not an early adopter and I do not easily fall for any vendor’s slick marketing. At a recent large user conference, a vendor’s staffer asked me why I wasn’t already using an iPad tablet computer. That question cracked me up, since I still use an Apple’s discontinued iBook notebook (besides the fact that I might only

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